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The role of parental psychopathology and family environment for social phobia in the first three decades of life.
Depress Anxiety. 2009; 26(4):363-70.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To examine the role of parental psychopathology and family environment for the risk of social phobia (SP) in offspring from childhood to early adulthood, encompassing the high risk period for SP.

METHODS

A community sample of 1,395 adolescents was prospectively followed-up over 10 years. Offspring and parental psychopathology were assessed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) using the Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI), and direct diagnostic interviews in parents were supplemented by family history reports. Parental rearing was assessed by the Questionnaire of Recalled Rearing Behavior administered to offspring. Family functioning was assessed by the McMaster Family Assessment Device administered to parents.

RESULTS

Parental SP was associated with offspring's risk to develop SP (OR=3.3, 95%CI:1.4-8.0). Other parental anxiety disorders (OR=2.9, 95%CI:1.4-6.1), depression (OR=2.6, 95%CI:1.2-5.4), and alcohol use disorders (OR=2.8, 95%CI:1.3-6.1) were also associated with offspring SP. Parental rearing styles of overprotection, rejection, and lack of emotional warmth were associated with offspring SP. Family functioning measures were not associated with offspring SP. Analyses of interaction of parental psychopathology and parental rearing indicated combined effects on the risk for offspring SP.

CONCLUSIONS

Parental psychopathology and rearing were associated with offspring SP, independently as well as in their interaction. Further delineation of these associations is warranted as malleable components of these risk factors may provide potential targets for prevention programs. In addition, parent-to-offspring transmission of other internalizing disorders should be considered to examine the degree of diagnostic specificity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden, Germany. knappe@psychologie.tu-dresden.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18839408

Citation

Knappe, Susanne, et al. "The Role of Parental Psychopathology and Family Environment for Social Phobia in the First Three Decades of Life." Depression and Anxiety, vol. 26, no. 4, 2009, pp. 363-70.
Knappe S, Lieb R, Beesdo K, et al. The role of parental psychopathology and family environment for social phobia in the first three decades of life. Depress Anxiety. 2009;26(4):363-70.
Knappe, S., Lieb, R., Beesdo, K., Fehm, L., Low, N. C., Gloster, A. T., & Wittchen, H. U. (2009). The role of parental psychopathology and family environment for social phobia in the first three decades of life. Depression and Anxiety, 26(4), 363-70. https://doi.org/10.1002/da.20527
Knappe S, et al. The Role of Parental Psychopathology and Family Environment for Social Phobia in the First Three Decades of Life. Depress Anxiety. 2009;26(4):363-70. PubMed PMID: 18839408.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of parental psychopathology and family environment for social phobia in the first three decades of life. AU - Knappe,Susanne, AU - Lieb,Roselind, AU - Beesdo,Katja, AU - Fehm,Lydia, AU - Low,Nancy Chooi Ping, AU - Gloster,Andrew T, AU - Wittchen,Hans-Ulrich, PY - 2008/10/8/pubmed PY - 2009/8/15/medline PY - 2008/10/8/entrez SP - 363 EP - 70 JF - Depression and anxiety JO - Depress Anxiety VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: To examine the role of parental psychopathology and family environment for the risk of social phobia (SP) in offspring from childhood to early adulthood, encompassing the high risk period for SP. METHODS: A community sample of 1,395 adolescents was prospectively followed-up over 10 years. Offspring and parental psychopathology were assessed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) using the Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI), and direct diagnostic interviews in parents were supplemented by family history reports. Parental rearing was assessed by the Questionnaire of Recalled Rearing Behavior administered to offspring. Family functioning was assessed by the McMaster Family Assessment Device administered to parents. RESULTS: Parental SP was associated with offspring's risk to develop SP (OR=3.3, 95%CI:1.4-8.0). Other parental anxiety disorders (OR=2.9, 95%CI:1.4-6.1), depression (OR=2.6, 95%CI:1.2-5.4), and alcohol use disorders (OR=2.8, 95%CI:1.3-6.1) were also associated with offspring SP. Parental rearing styles of overprotection, rejection, and lack of emotional warmth were associated with offspring SP. Family functioning measures were not associated with offspring SP. Analyses of interaction of parental psychopathology and parental rearing indicated combined effects on the risk for offspring SP. CONCLUSIONS: Parental psychopathology and rearing were associated with offspring SP, independently as well as in their interaction. Further delineation of these associations is warranted as malleable components of these risk factors may provide potential targets for prevention programs. In addition, parent-to-offspring transmission of other internalizing disorders should be considered to examine the degree of diagnostic specificity. SN - 1520-6394 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18839408/The_role_of_parental_psychopathology_and_family_environment_for_social_phobia_in_the_first_three_decades_of_life_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/da.20527 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -