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Enhanced zinc consumption prevents cadmium-induced alterations in lipid metabolism in male rats.
Chem Biol Interact. 2009 Jan 27; 177(2):142-52.CB

Abstract

It has been investigated, based on a rat model of human exposure to cadmium (Cd), whether zinc (Zn) supplementation may prevent Cd-induced alterations in lipid metabolism. For this purpose, the concentrations of free fatty acids (FFA), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TCh), and high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL and LDL, respectively) as well as the concentrations of chosen indices of lipid peroxidation such as lipid peroxides (LPO), F2-isoprostane (F2-IsoP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) were estimated in the serum of male Wistar rats administered Cd (5 or 50mg/l) or/and Zn (30 or 60mg/l) in drinking water for 6 months. The exposure to 5 and 50mg Cd/l resulted in marked alterations in the lipid status reflected in increased concentrations of FFA, TCh, LDL, LPO, F2-IsoP and oxLDL, and decreased concentrations of PL and HDL in the serum. The concentrations of LDL, LPO, F2-IsoP and oxLDL were more markedly enhanced at the higher Cd dosage. The supplementation with Zn during the exposure to 5 and 50mg Cd/l entirely prevented all the Cd-induced changes in the serum concentrations of the estimated lipid compounds and indices of lipid peroxidation, except for the F2-IsoP for which Zn provided only partial protection. Based on the results it can be concluded that Zn supplementation during exposure to Cd may have a protective effect on lipid metabolism consisting in its ability to prevent hyperlipidemia, including especially hypercholesterolemia, and to protect from lipid peroxidation. The findings seem to suggest that enhanced dietary Zn intake during Cd exposure, via preventing alterations in the body status of lipids may, at least partly, protect against some effects of Cd toxicity, including oxidative damage to the cellular membranes and atherogenic action. The paper is the first report suggesting protective impact of Zn against proatherogenic Cd action on experimental model of chronic moderate and relatively high human exposure to this toxic metal.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Toxicology, Medical University of Bialystok, Mickiewicza 2C, 15-222 Bialystok, Poland. asiarogalska@op.plNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18848534

Citation

Rogalska, Joanna, et al. "Enhanced Zinc Consumption Prevents Cadmium-induced Alterations in Lipid Metabolism in Male Rats." Chemico-biological Interactions, vol. 177, no. 2, 2009, pp. 142-52.
Rogalska J, Brzóska MM, Roszczenko A, et al. Enhanced zinc consumption prevents cadmium-induced alterations in lipid metabolism in male rats. Chem Biol Interact. 2009;177(2):142-52.
Rogalska, J., Brzóska, M. M., Roszczenko, A., & Moniuszko-Jakoniuk, J. (2009). Enhanced zinc consumption prevents cadmium-induced alterations in lipid metabolism in male rats. Chemico-biological Interactions, 177(2), 142-52. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbi.2008.09.011
Rogalska J, et al. Enhanced Zinc Consumption Prevents Cadmium-induced Alterations in Lipid Metabolism in Male Rats. Chem Biol Interact. 2009 Jan 27;177(2):142-52. PubMed PMID: 18848534.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Enhanced zinc consumption prevents cadmium-induced alterations in lipid metabolism in male rats. AU - Rogalska,Joanna, AU - Brzóska,Małgorzata M, AU - Roszczenko,Alicja, AU - Moniuszko-Jakoniuk,Janina, Y1 - 2008/09/19/ PY - 2008/07/10/received PY - 2008/09/07/revised PY - 2008/09/12/accepted PY - 2008/10/14/pubmed PY - 2009/1/14/medline PY - 2008/10/14/entrez SP - 142 EP - 52 JF - Chemico-biological interactions JO - Chem Biol Interact VL - 177 IS - 2 N2 - It has been investigated, based on a rat model of human exposure to cadmium (Cd), whether zinc (Zn) supplementation may prevent Cd-induced alterations in lipid metabolism. For this purpose, the concentrations of free fatty acids (FFA), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TCh), and high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL and LDL, respectively) as well as the concentrations of chosen indices of lipid peroxidation such as lipid peroxides (LPO), F2-isoprostane (F2-IsoP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) were estimated in the serum of male Wistar rats administered Cd (5 or 50mg/l) or/and Zn (30 or 60mg/l) in drinking water for 6 months. The exposure to 5 and 50mg Cd/l resulted in marked alterations in the lipid status reflected in increased concentrations of FFA, TCh, LDL, LPO, F2-IsoP and oxLDL, and decreased concentrations of PL and HDL in the serum. The concentrations of LDL, LPO, F2-IsoP and oxLDL were more markedly enhanced at the higher Cd dosage. The supplementation with Zn during the exposure to 5 and 50mg Cd/l entirely prevented all the Cd-induced changes in the serum concentrations of the estimated lipid compounds and indices of lipid peroxidation, except for the F2-IsoP for which Zn provided only partial protection. Based on the results it can be concluded that Zn supplementation during exposure to Cd may have a protective effect on lipid metabolism consisting in its ability to prevent hyperlipidemia, including especially hypercholesterolemia, and to protect from lipid peroxidation. The findings seem to suggest that enhanced dietary Zn intake during Cd exposure, via preventing alterations in the body status of lipids may, at least partly, protect against some effects of Cd toxicity, including oxidative damage to the cellular membranes and atherogenic action. The paper is the first report suggesting protective impact of Zn against proatherogenic Cd action on experimental model of chronic moderate and relatively high human exposure to this toxic metal. SN - 1872-7786 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18848534/Enhanced_zinc_consumption_prevents_cadmium_induced_alterations_in_lipid_metabolism_in_male_rats_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0009-2797(08)00496-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -