Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Influence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease on the long-term incidence of cataract: the Blue Mountains eye study.
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2008 Sep-Oct; 15(5):317-27.OE

Abstract

PURPOSE

To assess associations between diabetes and selected cardiovascular risk factors and long-term incident cataract and cataract surgery.

METHODS

A cohort of initially 3654 elderly Australians were followed over a period of 10 years. Questionnaires ascertained relevant history and fasting blood samples were taken. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and metabolic syndrome were defined using World Health Organization criteria. Discrete logistic models were used to assess risk of incident cataract.

RESULTS

After controlling for age, sex, and other factors, baseline diabetes predicted nuclear cataract (relative risk, RR, 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-2.64) and IFG predicted cortical cataract (RR, 2.01; CI, 1.20-3.36). Each standard deviation (SD) increase in glucose was positively associated with cortical cataract (RR, 1.13; CI, 1.01-1.27). Higher body mass index (BMI) was positively associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (RR per SD, 1.20; CI, 1.03-1.41). Persons using anti-hypertensive medication had a higher incidence of cataract surgery (RR, 1.61; CI, 1.18-2.20). Metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of all 3 cataract subtypes. Few other significant associations were found between cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular risk factors, and incident cataract or cataract surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

We confirmed diabetes as a risk factor for age-related cataract and IFG as a possible risk factor for cortical cataract. BMI and hypertension were also related to incident cataract. Overall, few associations were found between cardiovascular risk factors and long-term incident cataract. A cluster of metabolic abnormalities attributable to insulin resistance appears more likely to contribute to cataract formation than any individual cardiovascular risk factor alone.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology and Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18850468

Citation

Tan, Jennifer S L., et al. "Influence of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease On the Long-term Incidence of Cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study." Ophthalmic Epidemiology, vol. 15, no. 5, 2008, pp. 317-27.
Tan JS, Wang JJ, Mitchell P. Influence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease on the long-term incidence of cataract: the Blue Mountains eye study. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2008;15(5):317-27.
Tan, J. S., Wang, J. J., & Mitchell, P. (2008). Influence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease on the long-term incidence of cataract: the Blue Mountains eye study. Ophthalmic Epidemiology, 15(5), 317-27. https://doi.org/10.1080/09286580802105806
Tan JS, Wang JJ, Mitchell P. Influence of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease On the Long-term Incidence of Cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2008;15(5):317-27. PubMed PMID: 18850468.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease on the long-term incidence of cataract: the Blue Mountains eye study. AU - Tan,Jennifer S L, AU - Wang,Jie Jin, AU - Mitchell,Paul, PY - 2008/10/14/pubmed PY - 2008/11/5/medline PY - 2008/10/14/entrez SP - 317 EP - 27 JF - Ophthalmic epidemiology JO - Ophthalmic Epidemiol VL - 15 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: To assess associations between diabetes and selected cardiovascular risk factors and long-term incident cataract and cataract surgery. METHODS: A cohort of initially 3654 elderly Australians were followed over a period of 10 years. Questionnaires ascertained relevant history and fasting blood samples were taken. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and metabolic syndrome were defined using World Health Organization criteria. Discrete logistic models were used to assess risk of incident cataract. RESULTS: After controlling for age, sex, and other factors, baseline diabetes predicted nuclear cataract (relative risk, RR, 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-2.64) and IFG predicted cortical cataract (RR, 2.01; CI, 1.20-3.36). Each standard deviation (SD) increase in glucose was positively associated with cortical cataract (RR, 1.13; CI, 1.01-1.27). Higher body mass index (BMI) was positively associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (RR per SD, 1.20; CI, 1.03-1.41). Persons using anti-hypertensive medication had a higher incidence of cataract surgery (RR, 1.61; CI, 1.18-2.20). Metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of all 3 cataract subtypes. Few other significant associations were found between cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular risk factors, and incident cataract or cataract surgery. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed diabetes as a risk factor for age-related cataract and IFG as a possible risk factor for cortical cataract. BMI and hypertension were also related to incident cataract. Overall, few associations were found between cardiovascular risk factors and long-term incident cataract. A cluster of metabolic abnormalities attributable to insulin resistance appears more likely to contribute to cataract formation than any individual cardiovascular risk factor alone. SN - 1744-5086 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18850468/Influence_of_diabetes_and_cardiovascular_disease_on_the_long_term_incidence_of_cataract:_the_Blue_Mountains_eye_study_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09286580802105806 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -