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Facial erysipelas: report of a case and review of the literature.
J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1991; 49(10):1116-20JO

Abstract

The diagnosis of erysipelas is usually made clinically. Features that help distinguish erysipelas are acute onset, erythema, warmth, edema, pain, fever, and isolated regional involvement with clearly demarcated margins. High ASO titers and response to penicillin therapy are reassuring. Simple uncomplicated erysipelas or cellulitis in adults can usually be treated on an outpatient basis. Extensive facial involvement with fever and a toxic appearance warrants hospitalization. Facial cellulitis or erysipelas in children, unless quite limited, requires hospitalization because of the high risk of Hemophilus influenzae infection and sepsis. Hospitalized patients should show visible signs of resolution and be afebrile for at least 24 hours prior to discharge. They should be maintained on oral antibiotic therapy at home for an additional 7 to 10 days.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Florida, J Hillis Miller Health Center, Gainesville 32610.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1890524

Citation

Ochs, M W., and M F. Dolwick. "Facial Erysipelas: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature." Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery : Official Journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, vol. 49, no. 10, 1991, pp. 1116-20.
Ochs MW, Dolwick MF. Facial erysipelas: report of a case and review of the literature. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1991;49(10):1116-20.
Ochs, M. W., & Dolwick, M. F. (1991). Facial erysipelas: report of a case and review of the literature. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery : Official Journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, 49(10), pp. 1116-20.
Ochs MW, Dolwick MF. Facial Erysipelas: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1991;49(10):1116-20. PubMed PMID: 1890524.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Facial erysipelas: report of a case and review of the literature. AU - Ochs,M W, AU - Dolwick,M F, PY - 1991/10/1/pubmed PY - 1991/10/1/medline PY - 1991/10/1/entrez SP - 1116 EP - 20 JF - Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons JO - J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg. VL - 49 IS - 10 N2 - The diagnosis of erysipelas is usually made clinically. Features that help distinguish erysipelas are acute onset, erythema, warmth, edema, pain, fever, and isolated regional involvement with clearly demarcated margins. High ASO titers and response to penicillin therapy are reassuring. Simple uncomplicated erysipelas or cellulitis in adults can usually be treated on an outpatient basis. Extensive facial involvement with fever and a toxic appearance warrants hospitalization. Facial cellulitis or erysipelas in children, unless quite limited, requires hospitalization because of the high risk of Hemophilus influenzae infection and sepsis. Hospitalized patients should show visible signs of resolution and be afebrile for at least 24 hours prior to discharge. They should be maintained on oral antibiotic therapy at home for an additional 7 to 10 days. SN - 0278-2391 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1890524/Facial_erysipelas:_report_of_a_case_and_review_of_the_literature_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0278-2391(91)90148-F DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -