Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Outcome of medical and surgical treatment in dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy: 104 cases (1988-2004).
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Oct 15; 233(8):1284-90.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare outcomes and survival times for dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM; wobbler syndrome) treated medically or surgically.

DESIGN

Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS

104 dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs were included if the diagnosis of CSM had been made on the basis of results of diagnostic imaging and follow-up information (minimum, 6 months) was available. Ordinal logistic regression was used to compare outcomes and the product-limit method was used to compare survival times between dogs treated surgically and dogs treated medically.

RESULTS

37 dogs were treated surgically, and 67 were treated medically. Owners reported that 30 (81%) dogs treated surgically were improved, 1 (3%) was unchanged, and 6 (16%) were worse and that 36 (54%) dogs treated medically were improved, 18 (27%) were unchanged, and 13 (19%) were worse. Outcome was not significantly different between groups. Information on survival time was available for 33 dogs treated surgically and 43 dogs treated medically. Forty of the 76 (53%) dogs were euthanized because of CSM. Median and mean survival times were 36 and 48 months, respectively, for dogs treated medically and 36 and 46.5 months, respectively, for dogs treated surgically. Survival times did not differ significantly between groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In the present study, neither outcome nor survival time was significantly different between dogs with CSM treated medically and dogs treated surgically, suggesting that medical treatment is a viable and valuable option for management of dogs with CSM.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18922055

Citation

da Costa, Ronaldo C., et al. "Outcome of Medical and Surgical Treatment in Dogs With Cervical Spondylomyelopathy: 104 Cases (1988-2004)." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 233, no. 8, 2008, pp. 1284-90.
da Costa RC, Parent JM, Holmberg DL, et al. Outcome of medical and surgical treatment in dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy: 104 cases (1988-2004). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008;233(8):1284-90.
da Costa, R. C., Parent, J. M., Holmberg, D. L., Sinclair, D., & Monteith, G. (2008). Outcome of medical and surgical treatment in dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy: 104 cases (1988-2004). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 233(8), 1284-90. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.233.8.1284
da Costa RC, et al. Outcome of Medical and Surgical Treatment in Dogs With Cervical Spondylomyelopathy: 104 Cases (1988-2004). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Oct 15;233(8):1284-90. PubMed PMID: 18922055.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Outcome of medical and surgical treatment in dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy: 104 cases (1988-2004). AU - da Costa,Ronaldo C, AU - Parent,Joane M, AU - Holmberg,David L, AU - Sinclair,Diana, AU - Monteith,Gabrielle, PY - 2008/10/17/pubmed PY - 2009/2/20/medline PY - 2008/10/17/entrez SP - 1284 EP - 90 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc. VL - 233 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare outcomes and survival times for dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM; wobbler syndrome) treated medically or surgically. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. ANIMALS: 104 dogs. PROCEDURES: Medical records of dogs were included if the diagnosis of CSM had been made on the basis of results of diagnostic imaging and follow-up information (minimum, 6 months) was available. Ordinal logistic regression was used to compare outcomes and the product-limit method was used to compare survival times between dogs treated surgically and dogs treated medically. RESULTS: 37 dogs were treated surgically, and 67 were treated medically. Owners reported that 30 (81%) dogs treated surgically were improved, 1 (3%) was unchanged, and 6 (16%) were worse and that 36 (54%) dogs treated medically were improved, 18 (27%) were unchanged, and 13 (19%) were worse. Outcome was not significantly different between groups. Information on survival time was available for 33 dogs treated surgically and 43 dogs treated medically. Forty of the 76 (53%) dogs were euthanized because of CSM. Median and mean survival times were 36 and 48 months, respectively, for dogs treated medically and 36 and 46.5 months, respectively, for dogs treated surgically. Survival times did not differ significantly between groups. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: In the present study, neither outcome nor survival time was significantly different between dogs with CSM treated medically and dogs treated surgically, suggesting that medical treatment is a viable and valuable option for management of dogs with CSM. SN - 0003-1488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18922055/Outcome_of_medical_and_surgical_treatment_in_dogs_with_cervical_spondylomyelopathy:_104_cases__1988_2004__ L2 - http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/full/10.2460/javma.233.8.1284?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -