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Effects of a proprietary topical medication on wound healing and collagen deposition in horses.
Am J Vet Res 1991; 52(7):1128-31AJ

Abstract

Full-thickness skin wounds were created on the dorsum of both metacarpi in 8 horses. Three topical treatment regimens were studied. All wounds were bandaged with a nonadherent dressing, which was held in place with a snug elastic wrap. Group-A wounds were treated with a proprietary topical wound medication that consisted of a spray and an ointment. Group-B wounds were treated with the same regimen, except the putative active ingredients in the ointment were omitted. Group-C wounds were treated with a dry nonadherent bandage only. Wound dressings were changed every day and the limbs were photographed every other day until the wounds were healed. Specimens of normal skin and biopsy specimens of healed wounds were examined histologically and were assayed for hydroxyproline content. Wound healing measurements quantitated for each wound were number of days to healing, maximal wound size attained, day wound contraction commenced, day epithelium first noticed, rate of wound contraction, final wound size, and fraction of the wound that healed by contraction. The cosmetic appearance of the healed wounds was also graded. Significant differences were not noticed in hydroxyproline content, histologic appearance, or any of the wound healing measurements between treatment groups. The cosmetic appearance of healed group-A and -B wounds was significantly better than the appearance of group-C wounds. The topical treatment regimens studied neither enhanced nor inhibited wound healing in this study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Studies, University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, New Bolton Center, Kennett Square 19348.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1892268

Citation

Madison, J B., et al. "Effects of a Proprietary Topical Medication On Wound Healing and Collagen Deposition in Horses." American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 52, no. 7, 1991, pp. 1128-31.
Madison JB, Hamir AN, Ehrlich HP, et al. Effects of a proprietary topical medication on wound healing and collagen deposition in horses. Am J Vet Res. 1991;52(7):1128-31.
Madison, J. B., Hamir, A. N., Ehrlich, H. P., Haberman, J., Topkis, V., & Villasin, J. V. (1991). Effects of a proprietary topical medication on wound healing and collagen deposition in horses. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 52(7), pp. 1128-31.
Madison JB, et al. Effects of a Proprietary Topical Medication On Wound Healing and Collagen Deposition in Horses. Am J Vet Res. 1991;52(7):1128-31. PubMed PMID: 1892268.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of a proprietary topical medication on wound healing and collagen deposition in horses. AU - Madison,J B, AU - Hamir,A N, AU - Ehrlich,H P, AU - Haberman,J, AU - Topkis,V, AU - Villasin,J V, PY - 1991/7/1/pubmed PY - 1991/7/1/medline PY - 1991/7/1/entrez SP - 1128 EP - 31 JF - American journal of veterinary research JO - Am. J. Vet. Res. VL - 52 IS - 7 N2 - Full-thickness skin wounds were created on the dorsum of both metacarpi in 8 horses. Three topical treatment regimens were studied. All wounds were bandaged with a nonadherent dressing, which was held in place with a snug elastic wrap. Group-A wounds were treated with a proprietary topical wound medication that consisted of a spray and an ointment. Group-B wounds were treated with the same regimen, except the putative active ingredients in the ointment were omitted. Group-C wounds were treated with a dry nonadherent bandage only. Wound dressings were changed every day and the limbs were photographed every other day until the wounds were healed. Specimens of normal skin and biopsy specimens of healed wounds were examined histologically and were assayed for hydroxyproline content. Wound healing measurements quantitated for each wound were number of days to healing, maximal wound size attained, day wound contraction commenced, day epithelium first noticed, rate of wound contraction, final wound size, and fraction of the wound that healed by contraction. The cosmetic appearance of the healed wounds was also graded. Significant differences were not noticed in hydroxyproline content, histologic appearance, or any of the wound healing measurements between treatment groups. The cosmetic appearance of healed group-A and -B wounds was significantly better than the appearance of group-C wounds. The topical treatment regimens studied neither enhanced nor inhibited wound healing in this study. SN - 0002-9645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1892268/Effects_of_a_proprietary_topical_medication_on_wound_healing_and_collagen_deposition_in_horses_ L2 - https://www.lens.org/lens/search?q=citation_id:1892268 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -