Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Unusual association of tethered cord, filum terminale lipoma, and myxopapillary ependymoma.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2008 Oct 15; 33(22):E849-51.S

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN

Case report.

OBJECTIVE

We report a 67-year old man with a known filum terminale lipoma causing a tethered cord extending to the subcutaneous fat tissue and a newly diagnosed concomitant ependymoma, revealed on lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA

The coexistence of filum terminale lipoma and ependymoma is very rare. The underlying reason of this coexistence is still unknown. The patients with known filar lipoma causing a tethered cord can be underdiagnosed clinically even though new symptoms develop.

METHODS

Case study with lumbar MRI.

RESULTS

The patient was operated, and both of the ependymoma and filum terminale lipoma were removed. The pathologic examination was consistent with the MRI findings. Three months after surgery, the patient improved significantly.

CONCLUSION

The coexistence of filum terminale lipoma and ependymoma is rare. Patients with relevant symptoms may be referred for an MRI study; however, especially patients with known filar lipomas causing tethered cord may be missed. Therefore, including these patients, a contrast-enhanced lumbar MRI must be performed to exclude any coexistence of filum terminale lipoma and ependymoma in the early course of the disease which can also help the surgeon in guiding the appropriate treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. fuldemyildirim@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18923308

Citation

Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim, et al. "Unusual Association of Tethered Cord, Filum Terminale Lipoma, and Myxopapillary Ependymoma." Spine, vol. 33, no. 22, 2008, pp. E849-51.
Donmez FY, Basaran C, Ulu EM, et al. Unusual association of tethered cord, filum terminale lipoma, and myxopapillary ependymoma. Spine. 2008;33(22):E849-51.
Donmez, F. Y., Basaran, C., Ulu, E. M., Guvenc, Z., & Tarhan, N. C. (2008). Unusual association of tethered cord, filum terminale lipoma, and myxopapillary ependymoma. Spine, 33(22), E849-51. https://doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0b013e318187ff55
Donmez FY, et al. Unusual Association of Tethered Cord, Filum Terminale Lipoma, and Myxopapillary Ependymoma. Spine. 2008 Oct 15;33(22):E849-51. PubMed PMID: 18923308.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Unusual association of tethered cord, filum terminale lipoma, and myxopapillary ependymoma. AU - Donmez,Fuldem Yildirim, AU - Basaran,Ceyla, AU - Ulu,Esra Meltem Kayahan, AU - Guvenc,Zeynep, AU - Tarhan,Nefise Cagla, PY - 2008/10/17/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/10/17/entrez SP - E849 EP - 51 JF - Spine JO - Spine VL - 33 IS - 22 N2 - STUDY DESIGN: Case report. OBJECTIVE: We report a 67-year old man with a known filum terminale lipoma causing a tethered cord extending to the subcutaneous fat tissue and a newly diagnosed concomitant ependymoma, revealed on lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The coexistence of filum terminale lipoma and ependymoma is very rare. The underlying reason of this coexistence is still unknown. The patients with known filar lipoma causing a tethered cord can be underdiagnosed clinically even though new symptoms develop. METHODS: Case study with lumbar MRI. RESULTS: The patient was operated, and both of the ependymoma and filum terminale lipoma were removed. The pathologic examination was consistent with the MRI findings. Three months after surgery, the patient improved significantly. CONCLUSION: The coexistence of filum terminale lipoma and ependymoma is rare. Patients with relevant symptoms may be referred for an MRI study; however, especially patients with known filar lipomas causing tethered cord may be missed. Therefore, including these patients, a contrast-enhanced lumbar MRI must be performed to exclude any coexistence of filum terminale lipoma and ependymoma in the early course of the disease which can also help the surgeon in guiding the appropriate treatment. SN - 1528-1159 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18923308/Unusual_association_of_tethered_cord_filum_terminale_lipoma_and_myxopapillary_ependymoma_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0b013e318187ff55 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -