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Acute care among asthma patients using budesonide/formoterol or fluticasone propionate/salmeterol.
Respir Med. 2009 Feb; 103(2):237-43.RM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The combination of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting inhaled beta(2)-adrenergic-agonists has become the standard therapy for many patients with moderate to severe persistent asthma. Whether the differences between budesonide/formoterol and fluticasone/salmeterol translate into differences in treatment outcomes in a real life setting is unknown.

OBJECTIVES

This study compared the use of healthcare services between new users of budesonide/formoterol and fluticasone/salmeterol in a single inhaler between 2002 and 2004.

METHODS

A 12-month population-based retrospective cohort study using administrative health care databases was conducted. Asthma patients 16-65 years of age using budesonide/formoterol were matched according to age and markers of asthma severity to patients using fluticasone/salmeterol. The rate of emergency department (ED) visits for asthma, hospitalizations for asthma, claims for oral corticosteroids, and visits to a respiratory specialist were compared between the two groups using Poisson regression models. The mean number of doses of short-acting beta(2)-adrenergic-agonists (SABA) per week was compared between the two groups using a linear regression model.

RESULTS

Users of budesonide/formoterol were found to be less likely to have an ED visit for asthma (adjusted RR=0.72; 95% CI: 0.54-0.96), a hospitalization for asthma (adjusted RR=0.50; 95% CI: 0.25-0.99), a claim for oral corticosteroids (adjusted RR=0.83; 95% CI: 0.72-0.95), and use SABA (adjusted mean difference=-1.1 dose per week; 95% CI: -1.7; -0.5) than patients treated with fluticasone/salmeterol.

CONCLUSION

Our study has found that subjects initiating ICS/LABA treatment with budesonide/formoterol had better outcomes than those initiating treatment with fluticasone/salmeterol.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. lucie.blais@umontreal.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18930647

Citation

Blais, Lucie, et al. "Acute Care Among Asthma Patients Using Budesonide/formoterol or Fluticasone Propionate/salmeterol." Respiratory Medicine, vol. 103, no. 2, 2009, pp. 237-43.
Blais L, Beauchesne MF, Forget A. Acute care among asthma patients using budesonide/formoterol or fluticasone propionate/salmeterol. Respir Med. 2009;103(2):237-43.
Blais, L., Beauchesne, M. F., & Forget, A. (2009). Acute care among asthma patients using budesonide/formoterol or fluticasone propionate/salmeterol. Respiratory Medicine, 103(2), 237-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2008.09.001
Blais L, Beauchesne MF, Forget A. Acute Care Among Asthma Patients Using Budesonide/formoterol or Fluticasone Propionate/salmeterol. Respir Med. 2009;103(2):237-43. PubMed PMID: 18930647.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute care among asthma patients using budesonide/formoterol or fluticasone propionate/salmeterol. AU - Blais,Lucie, AU - Beauchesne,Marie-France, AU - Forget,Amélie, Y1 - 2008/10/18/ PY - 2008/04/30/received PY - 2008/08/29/revised PY - 2008/09/01/accepted PY - 2008/10/22/pubmed PY - 2009/3/17/medline PY - 2008/10/22/entrez SP - 237 EP - 43 JF - Respiratory medicine JO - Respir Med VL - 103 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The combination of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting inhaled beta(2)-adrenergic-agonists has become the standard therapy for many patients with moderate to severe persistent asthma. Whether the differences between budesonide/formoterol and fluticasone/salmeterol translate into differences in treatment outcomes in a real life setting is unknown. OBJECTIVES: This study compared the use of healthcare services between new users of budesonide/formoterol and fluticasone/salmeterol in a single inhaler between 2002 and 2004. METHODS: A 12-month population-based retrospective cohort study using administrative health care databases was conducted. Asthma patients 16-65 years of age using budesonide/formoterol were matched according to age and markers of asthma severity to patients using fluticasone/salmeterol. The rate of emergency department (ED) visits for asthma, hospitalizations for asthma, claims for oral corticosteroids, and visits to a respiratory specialist were compared between the two groups using Poisson regression models. The mean number of doses of short-acting beta(2)-adrenergic-agonists (SABA) per week was compared between the two groups using a linear regression model. RESULTS: Users of budesonide/formoterol were found to be less likely to have an ED visit for asthma (adjusted RR=0.72; 95% CI: 0.54-0.96), a hospitalization for asthma (adjusted RR=0.50; 95% CI: 0.25-0.99), a claim for oral corticosteroids (adjusted RR=0.83; 95% CI: 0.72-0.95), and use SABA (adjusted mean difference=-1.1 dose per week; 95% CI: -1.7; -0.5) than patients treated with fluticasone/salmeterol. CONCLUSION: Our study has found that subjects initiating ICS/LABA treatment with budesonide/formoterol had better outcomes than those initiating treatment with fluticasone/salmeterol. SN - 1532-3064 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18930647/Acute_care_among_asthma_patients_using_budesonide/formoterol_or_fluticasone_propionate/salmeterol_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0954-6111(08)00316-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -