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Dietary arachidonic acid dose-dependently increases the arachidonic acid concentration in human milk.
J Nutr 2008; 138(11):2190-7JN

Abstract

Lactation hampers normalization of the maternal arachidonic acid (AA) status, which is reduced after pregnancy and can further decline by the presently recommended increased consumption of (n-3) long-chain PUFA [(n-3) LCPUFA]. This may be unfavorable for breast-fed infants, because they also require an optimum supply of (n-6) LCPUFA. We therefore investigated the LCPUFA responses in nursing mothers upon increased consumption of AA and (n-3) LCPUFA. In a parallel, double-blind, controlled trial, lactating women received for 8 wk no extra LCPUFA (control group, n = 8), 200 (low AA group, n = 9), or 400 (high AA group, n = 8) mg/d AA in combination with (n-3) LCPUFA [320 mg/d docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 80 mg/d eicosapentaenoic acid, and 80 mg/d other (n-3) fatty acids], or this dose of (n-3) LCPUFA alone [DHA + eicosapentaenoic acid group, n = 8]. Relative concentrations of AA, DHA, and sums of (n-6) and (n-3) LCPUFA were measured in milk total lipids (TL) and erythrocyte phospholipids (PL) after 2 and 8 wk and changes were compared by ANCOVA. The combined consumption of AA and (n-3) LCPUFA caused dose-dependent elevations of AA and total (n-6) LCPUFA concentrations in milk TL and did not significantly affect the DHA and total (n-3) LCPUFA increases caused by (n-3) LCPUFA supplementation only. This latter treatment did not significantly affect breast milk AA and total (n-6) LCPUFA concentrations. AA and DHA concentrations in milk TL and their changes were strongly and positively correlated with their corresponding values in erythrocyte PL (r(2) = 0.27-0.50; P </= 0.002). We thus concluded that the consumption by lactating women of AA in addition to extra (n-3) LCPUFA dose dependently increased the AA concentration of their milk TL.

Authors+Show Affiliations

NutriScience BV, 6229 EV Maastricht, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18936218

Citation

Weseler, Antje R., et al. "Dietary Arachidonic Acid Dose-dependently Increases the Arachidonic Acid Concentration in Human Milk." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 138, no. 11, 2008, pp. 2190-7.
Weseler AR, Dirix CE, Bruins MJ, et al. Dietary arachidonic acid dose-dependently increases the arachidonic acid concentration in human milk. J Nutr. 2008;138(11):2190-7.
Weseler, A. R., Dirix, C. E., Bruins, M. J., & Hornstra, G. (2008). Dietary arachidonic acid dose-dependently increases the arachidonic acid concentration in human milk. The Journal of Nutrition, 138(11), pp. 2190-7. doi:10.3945/jn.108.089318.
Weseler AR, et al. Dietary Arachidonic Acid Dose-dependently Increases the Arachidonic Acid Concentration in Human Milk. J Nutr. 2008;138(11):2190-7. PubMed PMID: 18936218.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary arachidonic acid dose-dependently increases the arachidonic acid concentration in human milk. AU - Weseler,Antje R, AU - Dirix,Chantal E H, AU - Bruins,Maaike J, AU - Hornstra,Gerard, PY - 2008/10/22/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/10/22/entrez SP - 2190 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 138 IS - 11 N2 - Lactation hampers normalization of the maternal arachidonic acid (AA) status, which is reduced after pregnancy and can further decline by the presently recommended increased consumption of (n-3) long-chain PUFA [(n-3) LCPUFA]. This may be unfavorable for breast-fed infants, because they also require an optimum supply of (n-6) LCPUFA. We therefore investigated the LCPUFA responses in nursing mothers upon increased consumption of AA and (n-3) LCPUFA. In a parallel, double-blind, controlled trial, lactating women received for 8 wk no extra LCPUFA (control group, n = 8), 200 (low AA group, n = 9), or 400 (high AA group, n = 8) mg/d AA in combination with (n-3) LCPUFA [320 mg/d docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 80 mg/d eicosapentaenoic acid, and 80 mg/d other (n-3) fatty acids], or this dose of (n-3) LCPUFA alone [DHA + eicosapentaenoic acid group, n = 8]. Relative concentrations of AA, DHA, and sums of (n-6) and (n-3) LCPUFA were measured in milk total lipids (TL) and erythrocyte phospholipids (PL) after 2 and 8 wk and changes were compared by ANCOVA. The combined consumption of AA and (n-3) LCPUFA caused dose-dependent elevations of AA and total (n-6) LCPUFA concentrations in milk TL and did not significantly affect the DHA and total (n-3) LCPUFA increases caused by (n-3) LCPUFA supplementation only. This latter treatment did not significantly affect breast milk AA and total (n-6) LCPUFA concentrations. AA and DHA concentrations in milk TL and their changes were strongly and positively correlated with their corresponding values in erythrocyte PL (r(2) = 0.27-0.50; P </= 0.002). We thus concluded that the consumption by lactating women of AA in addition to extra (n-3) LCPUFA dose dependently increased the AA concentration of their milk TL. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18936218/Dietary_arachidonic_acid_dose_dependently_increases_the_arachidonic_acid_concentration_in_human_milk_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.108.089318 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -