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Dietary iron intake and risk of Parkinson's disease.
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Dec 15; 168(12):1381-8.AJ

Abstract

Dietary iron is the most important source of iron stores. Several case-control studies have described the association of high dietary iron and Parkinson's disease, but prospective data are lacking. The authors prospectively followed 47,406 men and 76,947 women from the United States who provided information through a mailed questionnaire on their diet, medical history, and lifestyle practices between 1984 and 2000. The authors documented 422 new cases of Parkinson's disease. Total iron intake was not associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease (relative risk (RR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74, 1.65; P(trend) = 0.84), but dietary nonheme iron intake from food was associated with a 30% increased risk of Parkinson's disease (RR = 1.27, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.76; P(trend) = 0.02). A secondary analysis revealed that Parkinson's disease risk was significantly increased among individuals with high nonheme iron and low vitamin C intakes (RR = 1.92, 95% CI: 1.14, 3.32; P(trend) = 0.002). Supplemental iron intake was associated with a borderline increase in Parkinson's disease risk among men. Although the authors' prospective data did not support an association between total iron intake (dietary and supplemental) and risk of Parkinson's disease, a 30% increased risk was associated with a diet rich in nonheme iron. This increase in risk was present in those who had low vitamin C intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Bari, Bari, Italy. giancarlo.logroscino@neurol.uniba.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18945687

Citation

Logroscino, Giancarlo, et al. "Dietary Iron Intake and Risk of Parkinson's Disease." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 168, no. 12, 2008, pp. 1381-8.
Logroscino G, Gao X, Chen H, et al. Dietary iron intake and risk of Parkinson's disease. Am J Epidemiol. 2008;168(12):1381-8.
Logroscino, G., Gao, X., Chen, H., Wing, A., & Ascherio, A. (2008). Dietary iron intake and risk of Parkinson's disease. American Journal of Epidemiology, 168(12), 1381-8. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwn273
Logroscino G, et al. Dietary Iron Intake and Risk of Parkinson's Disease. Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Dec 15;168(12):1381-8. PubMed PMID: 18945687.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary iron intake and risk of Parkinson's disease. AU - Logroscino,Giancarlo, AU - Gao,Xiang, AU - Chen,Honglei, AU - Wing,Al, AU - Ascherio,Alberto, Y1 - 2008/10/21/ PY - 2008/10/24/pubmed PY - 2008/12/31/medline PY - 2008/10/24/entrez SP - 1381 EP - 8 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am J Epidemiol VL - 168 IS - 12 N2 - Dietary iron is the most important source of iron stores. Several case-control studies have described the association of high dietary iron and Parkinson's disease, but prospective data are lacking. The authors prospectively followed 47,406 men and 76,947 women from the United States who provided information through a mailed questionnaire on their diet, medical history, and lifestyle practices between 1984 and 2000. The authors documented 422 new cases of Parkinson's disease. Total iron intake was not associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease (relative risk (RR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74, 1.65; P(trend) = 0.84), but dietary nonheme iron intake from food was associated with a 30% increased risk of Parkinson's disease (RR = 1.27, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.76; P(trend) = 0.02). A secondary analysis revealed that Parkinson's disease risk was significantly increased among individuals with high nonheme iron and low vitamin C intakes (RR = 1.92, 95% CI: 1.14, 3.32; P(trend) = 0.002). Supplemental iron intake was associated with a borderline increase in Parkinson's disease risk among men. Although the authors' prospective data did not support an association between total iron intake (dietary and supplemental) and risk of Parkinson's disease, a 30% increased risk was associated with a diet rich in nonheme iron. This increase in risk was present in those who had low vitamin C intake. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18945687/Dietary_iron_intake_and_risk_of_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwn273 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -