Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

DSM-IV psychiatric disorder comorbidity and its correlates in binge eating disorder.
Int J Eat Disord. 2009 Apr; 42(3):228-34.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess DSM-IV lifetime and current psychiatric disorder comorbidity in patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and to examine associations of comorbidity with gender, selected historical obesity-related variables, and current eating disorder psychopathology.

METHOD

A consecutive series of 404 patients with BED (310 women, 94 men) were reliably administered semistructured diagnostic and clinical interviews to assess DSM-IV psychiatric disorders and features of eating disorders.

RESULTS

Overall, 73.8% of patients with BED had at least one additional lifetime psychiatric disorder and 43.1% had at least one current psychiatric disorder. Lifetime-wise, mood (54.2%), anxiety (37.1%), and substance use (24.8%) disorders were most common. In terms of current comorbidity, mood (26.0%) and anxiety (24.5%) were most common. Few gender differences were observed; men had higher lifetime rates of substance use disorders and current rates of obsessive compulsive disorder. Patients with BED with current psychiatric comorbidity reported earlier age at first diet and higher "lifetime-high" BMI. Patients with current comorbidity also had significantly higher levels of current eating disorder psychopathology and negative affect and lower self-esteem relative to patients with BED with either lifetime (noncurrent) or no psychiatric histories.

DISCUSSION

Among treatment-seeking patients with BED, the presence of current psychiatric comorbidity is associated with greater eating disorder psychopathology and associated distress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. carlos.grilo@yale.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18951458

Citation

Grilo, Carlos M., et al. "DSM-IV Psychiatric Disorder Comorbidity and Its Correlates in Binge Eating Disorder." The International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol. 42, no. 3, 2009, pp. 228-34.
Grilo CM, White MA, Masheb RM. DSM-IV psychiatric disorder comorbidity and its correlates in binge eating disorder. Int J Eat Disord. 2009;42(3):228-34.
Grilo, C. M., White, M. A., & Masheb, R. M. (2009). DSM-IV psychiatric disorder comorbidity and its correlates in binge eating disorder. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 42(3), 228-34. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.20599
Grilo CM, White MA, Masheb RM. DSM-IV Psychiatric Disorder Comorbidity and Its Correlates in Binge Eating Disorder. Int J Eat Disord. 2009;42(3):228-34. PubMed PMID: 18951458.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - DSM-IV psychiatric disorder comorbidity and its correlates in binge eating disorder. AU - Grilo,Carlos M, AU - White,Marney A, AU - Masheb,Robin M, PY - 2008/10/28/pubmed PY - 2009/6/19/medline PY - 2008/10/28/entrez SP - 228 EP - 34 JF - The International journal of eating disorders JO - Int J Eat Disord VL - 42 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess DSM-IV lifetime and current psychiatric disorder comorbidity in patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and to examine associations of comorbidity with gender, selected historical obesity-related variables, and current eating disorder psychopathology. METHOD: A consecutive series of 404 patients with BED (310 women, 94 men) were reliably administered semistructured diagnostic and clinical interviews to assess DSM-IV psychiatric disorders and features of eating disorders. RESULTS: Overall, 73.8% of patients with BED had at least one additional lifetime psychiatric disorder and 43.1% had at least one current psychiatric disorder. Lifetime-wise, mood (54.2%), anxiety (37.1%), and substance use (24.8%) disorders were most common. In terms of current comorbidity, mood (26.0%) and anxiety (24.5%) were most common. Few gender differences were observed; men had higher lifetime rates of substance use disorders and current rates of obsessive compulsive disorder. Patients with BED with current psychiatric comorbidity reported earlier age at first diet and higher "lifetime-high" BMI. Patients with current comorbidity also had significantly higher levels of current eating disorder psychopathology and negative affect and lower self-esteem relative to patients with BED with either lifetime (noncurrent) or no psychiatric histories. DISCUSSION: Among treatment-seeking patients with BED, the presence of current psychiatric comorbidity is associated with greater eating disorder psychopathology and associated distress. SN - 1098-108X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18951458/DSM_IV_psychiatric_disorder_comorbidity_and_its_correlates_in_binge_eating_disorder_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.20599 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -