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A meta-analysis of 25 years of mood-creativity research: hedonic tone, activation, or regulatory focus?
Psychol Bull 2008; 134(6):779-806PB

Abstract

This meta-analysis synthesized 102 effect sizes reflecting the relation between specific moods and creativity. Effect sizes overall revealed that positive moods produce more creativity than mood-neutral controls (r= .15), but no significant differences between negative moods and mood-neutral controls (r= -.03) or between positive and negative moods (r= .04) were observed. Creativity is enhanced most by positive mood states that are activating and associated with an approach motivation and promotion focus (e.g., happiness), rather than those that are deactivating and associated with an avoidance motivation and prevention focus (e.g., relaxed). Negative, deactivating moods with an approach motivation and a promotion focus (e.g., sadness) were not associated with creativity, but negative, activating moods with an avoidance motivation and a prevention focus (fear, anxiety) were associated with lower creativity, especially when assessed as cognitive flexibility. With a few exceptions, these results generalized across experimental and correlational designs, populations (students vs. general adult population), and facet of creativity (e.g., fluency, flexibility, originality, eureka/insight). The authors discuss theoretical implications and highlight avenues for future research on specific moods, creativity, and their relationships.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. m.baas@uva.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18954157

Citation

Baas, Matthijs, et al. "A Meta-analysis of 25 Years of Mood-creativity Research: Hedonic Tone, Activation, or Regulatory Focus?" Psychological Bulletin, vol. 134, no. 6, 2008, pp. 779-806.
Baas M, De Dreu CK, Nijstad BA. A meta-analysis of 25 years of mood-creativity research: hedonic tone, activation, or regulatory focus? Psychol Bull. 2008;134(6):779-806.
Baas, M., De Dreu, C. K., & Nijstad, B. A. (2008). A meta-analysis of 25 years of mood-creativity research: hedonic tone, activation, or regulatory focus? Psychological Bulletin, 134(6), pp. 779-806. doi:10.1037/a0012815.
Baas M, De Dreu CK, Nijstad BA. A Meta-analysis of 25 Years of Mood-creativity Research: Hedonic Tone, Activation, or Regulatory Focus. Psychol Bull. 2008;134(6):779-806. PubMed PMID: 18954157.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A meta-analysis of 25 years of mood-creativity research: hedonic tone, activation, or regulatory focus? AU - Baas,Matthijs, AU - De Dreu,Carsten K W, AU - Nijstad,Bernard A, PY - 2008/10/29/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/10/29/entrez SP - 779 EP - 806 JF - Psychological bulletin JO - Psychol Bull VL - 134 IS - 6 N2 - This meta-analysis synthesized 102 effect sizes reflecting the relation between specific moods and creativity. Effect sizes overall revealed that positive moods produce more creativity than mood-neutral controls (r= .15), but no significant differences between negative moods and mood-neutral controls (r= -.03) or between positive and negative moods (r= .04) were observed. Creativity is enhanced most by positive mood states that are activating and associated with an approach motivation and promotion focus (e.g., happiness), rather than those that are deactivating and associated with an avoidance motivation and prevention focus (e.g., relaxed). Negative, deactivating moods with an approach motivation and a promotion focus (e.g., sadness) were not associated with creativity, but negative, activating moods with an avoidance motivation and a prevention focus (fear, anxiety) were associated with lower creativity, especially when assessed as cognitive flexibility. With a few exceptions, these results generalized across experimental and correlational designs, populations (students vs. general adult population), and facet of creativity (e.g., fluency, flexibility, originality, eureka/insight). The authors discuss theoretical implications and highlight avenues for future research on specific moods, creativity, and their relationships. SN - 0033-2909 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18954157/A_meta_analysis_of_25_years_of_mood_creativity_research:_hedonic_tone_activation_or_regulatory_focus L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/bul/134/6/779 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -