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The impact of perceived racial discrimination on the mental health of Asian American and Latino college students.
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2008 Oct; 14(4):326-35.CD

Abstract

The authors examined the impact of perceived racial discrimination on various mental health outcomes for Asian American and Latino college students within an emic and etic framework. Results indicate that Asian American and Latino college students experienced similar exposure and reactions to various kinds of discrimination. However, Latino students were more likely than Asian American students to have been accused of doing something wrong, such as cheating and breaking the law, and more likely to appraise these experiences as stressful. Asian Americans evidenced higher risk for trait anxiety. Regardless of ethnicity, perceived racial discrimination was associated with several negative mental health outcomes, including higher psychological distress, suicidal ideation, state anxiety, trait anxiety, and depression. Findings highlight the need to address discrimination across multiple social and professional settings and to understand the broad array of mental health outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, CA 91711, USA. whwang@cmc.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18954168

Citation

Hwang, Wei-Chin, and Sharon Goto. "The Impact of Perceived Racial Discrimination On the Mental Health of Asian American and Latino College Students." Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, vol. 14, no. 4, 2008, pp. 326-35.
Hwang WC, Goto S. The impact of perceived racial discrimination on the mental health of Asian American and Latino college students. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2008;14(4):326-35.
Hwang, W. C., & Goto, S. (2008). The impact of perceived racial discrimination on the mental health of Asian American and Latino college students. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, 14(4), 326-35. https://doi.org/10.1037/1099-9809.14.4.326
Hwang WC, Goto S. The Impact of Perceived Racial Discrimination On the Mental Health of Asian American and Latino College Students. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2008;14(4):326-35. PubMed PMID: 18954168.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of perceived racial discrimination on the mental health of Asian American and Latino college students. AU - Hwang,Wei-Chin, AU - Goto,Sharon, PY - 2008/10/29/pubmed PY - 2008/12/18/medline PY - 2008/10/29/entrez SP - 326 EP - 35 JF - Cultural diversity & ethnic minority psychology JO - Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol VL - 14 IS - 4 N2 - The authors examined the impact of perceived racial discrimination on various mental health outcomes for Asian American and Latino college students within an emic and etic framework. Results indicate that Asian American and Latino college students experienced similar exposure and reactions to various kinds of discrimination. However, Latino students were more likely than Asian American students to have been accused of doing something wrong, such as cheating and breaking the law, and more likely to appraise these experiences as stressful. Asian Americans evidenced higher risk for trait anxiety. Regardless of ethnicity, perceived racial discrimination was associated with several negative mental health outcomes, including higher psychological distress, suicidal ideation, state anxiety, trait anxiety, and depression. Findings highlight the need to address discrimination across multiple social and professional settings and to understand the broad array of mental health outcomes. SN - 1099-9809 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18954168/The_impact_of_perceived_racial_discrimination_on_the_mental_health_of_Asian_American_and_Latino_college_students_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/cdp/14/4/326 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -