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Impact of external nasal strips on nasal geometry and intranasal air-conditioning.
Am J Rhinol. 2008 Sep-Oct; 22(5):506-10.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The anterior nasal segment is the most effective part of the nasal airways when it comes to warming and humidification of the inhaled air. Any changes in nasal geometry in this segment modifying the airflow could therefore affect nasal air conditioning. The goal of this study was to examine if external nasal strips have an influence on intranasal geometry and air-conditioning.

METHODS

Twenty healthy volunteers (mean age, 36 years) were enrolled in the study. All volunteers received active anterior rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry before and while wearing commercially available external nasal strips. In addition, in vivo air temperature and humidity were measured with and without nasal strips at the defined intranasal sites.

RESULTS

No statistically significant changes in temperature, humidity, and rhinomanometric values were detected during the use of nasal strips (p > 0.05). The statistical analysis of the acoustic rhinometric results showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the minimal cross-sectional areas (MCA) 1 (0-2 cm) and MCA2 (2-5 cm) and the nasal volume (Vol) 1 (0-2 cm). On the other hand, the nasal strips did not significantly alter the nasal Vol2 (2-5 cm; p > 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Changes in the nasal geometry of the anterior part of the nose by wearing nasal strips did not relevantly alter intranasal air-conditioning. The application of nasal strips entails an increase in MCAs but not in nasal airflow Vol.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany. joerg.lindemann@uniklinik-ulm.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18954510

Citation

Lindemann, Joerg, et al. "Impact of External Nasal Strips On Nasal Geometry and Intranasal Air-conditioning." American Journal of Rhinology, vol. 22, no. 5, 2008, pp. 506-10.
Lindemann J, Tsakiropoulou E, Keck T, et al. Impact of external nasal strips on nasal geometry and intranasal air-conditioning. Am J Rhinol. 2008;22(5):506-10.
Lindemann, J., Tsakiropoulou, E., Keck, T., Leiacker, R., Vital, V., & Wiesmiller, K. M. (2008). Impact of external nasal strips on nasal geometry and intranasal air-conditioning. American Journal of Rhinology, 22(5), 506-10. https://doi.org/10.2500/ajr.2008.22.3215
Lindemann J, et al. Impact of External Nasal Strips On Nasal Geometry and Intranasal Air-conditioning. Am J Rhinol. 2008;22(5):506-10. PubMed PMID: 18954510.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of external nasal strips on nasal geometry and intranasal air-conditioning. AU - Lindemann,Joerg, AU - Tsakiropoulou,Evangelia, AU - Keck,Tilman, AU - Leiacker,Richard, AU - Vital,Victor, AU - Wiesmiller,Kerstin M, PY - 2008/10/29/pubmed PY - 2008/11/15/medline PY - 2008/10/29/entrez SP - 506 EP - 10 JF - American journal of rhinology JO - Am J Rhinol VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The anterior nasal segment is the most effective part of the nasal airways when it comes to warming and humidification of the inhaled air. Any changes in nasal geometry in this segment modifying the airflow could therefore affect nasal air conditioning. The goal of this study was to examine if external nasal strips have an influence on intranasal geometry and air-conditioning. METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers (mean age, 36 years) were enrolled in the study. All volunteers received active anterior rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry before and while wearing commercially available external nasal strips. In addition, in vivo air temperature and humidity were measured with and without nasal strips at the defined intranasal sites. RESULTS: No statistically significant changes in temperature, humidity, and rhinomanometric values were detected during the use of nasal strips (p > 0.05). The statistical analysis of the acoustic rhinometric results showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the minimal cross-sectional areas (MCA) 1 (0-2 cm) and MCA2 (2-5 cm) and the nasal volume (Vol) 1 (0-2 cm). On the other hand, the nasal strips did not significantly alter the nasal Vol2 (2-5 cm; p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Changes in the nasal geometry of the anterior part of the nose by wearing nasal strips did not relevantly alter intranasal air-conditioning. The application of nasal strips entails an increase in MCAs but not in nasal airflow Vol. SN - 1050-6586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18954510/Impact_of_external_nasal_strips_on_nasal_geometry_and_intranasal_air_conditioning_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -