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Minor-form, microform, and mini-microform cleft lip: anatomical features, operative techniques, and revisions.
Plast Reconstr Surg 2008; 122(5):1485-93PR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Whatever method of closure, a cleft lip scar extends along the full labial height. A smaller scar is possible in repair of limited forms of incomplete cleft lip. This retrospective study was undertaken to define the subgroups of lesser-form cleft lip, describe technical alternatives, and review results of repair.

METHODS

The senior author's (J.B.M.) registry was searched for patients with lesser-form cleft lip, defined by the extent of vermilion-cutaneous dysjunction as either minor-form, microform, or mini-microform. Techniques for repair of these three anatomical variants were examined and the revisions were analyzed.

RESULTS

Of 393 patients with unilateral incomplete cleft lip, 59 lesser-form variants were identified. Minor-form clefts (n = 20), defined as a defect extending 3 mm or more above the normal Cupid's bow peak, were repaired by rotation-advancement. Microform clefts (n = 28), defined as a vermilion-cutaneous notch less than 3 mm above the normal peak, were corrected by double unilimb Z-plasty. Mini-microform clefts (n = 11), defined as a disrupted vermilion-cutaneous junction without elevation of the bow peak, were repaired by vertical lenticular excision. Primary nasal correction was necessary in all minor-form and microform types and in some mini-microform types. In all three lesser-forms, the rate of nasolabial revision was relatively low in comparison with that for unilateral complete cleft lip.

CONCLUSIONS

The extent of disruption at the vermilion-cutaneous junction defines minor-form, microform, and mini-microform cleft lip. These anatomical designations determine the method of nasolabial repair and correlate with types and frequency of revision.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plastic Surgery, Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18971733

Citation

Yuzuriha, Shunsuke, and John B. Mulliken. "Minor-form, Microform, and Mini-microform Cleft Lip: Anatomical Features, Operative Techniques, and Revisions." Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol. 122, no. 5, 2008, pp. 1485-93.
Yuzuriha S, Mulliken JB. Minor-form, microform, and mini-microform cleft lip: anatomical features, operative techniques, and revisions. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2008;122(5):1485-93.
Yuzuriha, S., & Mulliken, J. B. (2008). Minor-form, microform, and mini-microform cleft lip: anatomical features, operative techniques, and revisions. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 122(5), pp. 1485-93. doi:10.1097/PRS.0b013e31818820bc.
Yuzuriha S, Mulliken JB. Minor-form, Microform, and Mini-microform Cleft Lip: Anatomical Features, Operative Techniques, and Revisions. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2008;122(5):1485-93. PubMed PMID: 18971733.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Minor-form, microform, and mini-microform cleft lip: anatomical features, operative techniques, and revisions. AU - Yuzuriha,Shunsuke, AU - Mulliken,John B, PY - 2008/10/31/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/10/31/entrez SP - 1485 EP - 93 JF - Plastic and reconstructive surgery JO - Plast. Reconstr. Surg. VL - 122 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Whatever method of closure, a cleft lip scar extends along the full labial height. A smaller scar is possible in repair of limited forms of incomplete cleft lip. This retrospective study was undertaken to define the subgroups of lesser-form cleft lip, describe technical alternatives, and review results of repair. METHODS: The senior author's (J.B.M.) registry was searched for patients with lesser-form cleft lip, defined by the extent of vermilion-cutaneous dysjunction as either minor-form, microform, or mini-microform. Techniques for repair of these three anatomical variants were examined and the revisions were analyzed. RESULTS: Of 393 patients with unilateral incomplete cleft lip, 59 lesser-form variants were identified. Minor-form clefts (n = 20), defined as a defect extending 3 mm or more above the normal Cupid's bow peak, were repaired by rotation-advancement. Microform clefts (n = 28), defined as a vermilion-cutaneous notch less than 3 mm above the normal peak, were corrected by double unilimb Z-plasty. Mini-microform clefts (n = 11), defined as a disrupted vermilion-cutaneous junction without elevation of the bow peak, were repaired by vertical lenticular excision. Primary nasal correction was necessary in all minor-form and microform types and in some mini-microform types. In all three lesser-forms, the rate of nasolabial revision was relatively low in comparison with that for unilateral complete cleft lip. CONCLUSIONS: The extent of disruption at the vermilion-cutaneous junction defines minor-form, microform, and mini-microform cleft lip. These anatomical designations determine the method of nasolabial repair and correlate with types and frequency of revision. SN - 1529-4242 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18971733/Minor_form_microform_and_mini_microform_cleft_lip:_anatomical_features_operative_techniques_and_revisions_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=18971733 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -