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Dental caries and allergic disorders in Japanese children: the Ryukyus Child Health Study.
J Asthma. 2008 Nov; 45(9):795-9.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dental caries is an infectious disease and is highly prevalent among children. In the etiology of allergic diseases, the hygiene hypothesis contends that infections might confer protection against the development of allergic diseases. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between dental caries and the prevalence of allergic disorders.

METHODS

Study subjects were 21,792 children 6 to 15 years of age in Okinawa, Japan. Outcomes were based on diagnostic criteria from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Data on dental caries were obtained from school records. Children were classified as having dental caries if one or more teeth had decayed and/or had been filled. Adjustment was made for sex, age, region of residence, number of siblings, smoking in the household, paternal and maternal history of asthma, atopic eczema, or allergic rhinitis, and paternal and maternal educational level.

RESULTS

The prevalence of wheeze, asthma, atopic eczema, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the previous 12 months was 10.8%, 7.6%, 6.8%, and 7.6%, respectively. In an overall analysis, no measurable relationship was found between dental caries and the prevalence of wheeze, asthma, atopic eczema, or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. However, dental caries was significantly inversely associated with the prevalence of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis only among children with a positive parental allergic history: The adjusted odds ratio was 0.84 (95% confidence interval: 0.72, 0.99).

CONCLUSIONS

The present findings do not support the hypothesis that dental caries was protective against allergic diseases. However, a parental allergic history may affect the association between dental caries and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka, Japan. k-tanaka@fukuoka-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18972298

Citation

Tanaka, Keiko, et al. "Dental Caries and Allergic Disorders in Japanese Children: the Ryukyus Child Health Study." The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, vol. 45, no. 9, 2008, pp. 795-9.
Tanaka K, Miyake Y, Arakawa M, et al. Dental caries and allergic disorders in Japanese children: the Ryukyus Child Health Study. J Asthma. 2008;45(9):795-9.
Tanaka, K., Miyake, Y., Arakawa, M., Sasaki, S., & Ohya, Y. (2008). Dental caries and allergic disorders in Japanese children: the Ryukyus Child Health Study. The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, 45(9), 795-9. https://doi.org/10.1080/02770900802252119
Tanaka K, et al. Dental Caries and Allergic Disorders in Japanese Children: the Ryukyus Child Health Study. J Asthma. 2008;45(9):795-9. PubMed PMID: 18972298.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dental caries and allergic disorders in Japanese children: the Ryukyus Child Health Study. AU - Tanaka,Keiko, AU - Miyake,Yoshihiro, AU - Arakawa,Masashi, AU - Sasaki,Satoshi, AU - Ohya,Yukihiro, PY - 2008/10/31/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/10/31/entrez SP - 795 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma JO - J Asthma VL - 45 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dental caries is an infectious disease and is highly prevalent among children. In the etiology of allergic diseases, the hygiene hypothesis contends that infections might confer protection against the development of allergic diseases. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between dental caries and the prevalence of allergic disorders. METHODS: Study subjects were 21,792 children 6 to 15 years of age in Okinawa, Japan. Outcomes were based on diagnostic criteria from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Data on dental caries were obtained from school records. Children were classified as having dental caries if one or more teeth had decayed and/or had been filled. Adjustment was made for sex, age, region of residence, number of siblings, smoking in the household, paternal and maternal history of asthma, atopic eczema, or allergic rhinitis, and paternal and maternal educational level. RESULTS: The prevalence of wheeze, asthma, atopic eczema, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the previous 12 months was 10.8%, 7.6%, 6.8%, and 7.6%, respectively. In an overall analysis, no measurable relationship was found between dental caries and the prevalence of wheeze, asthma, atopic eczema, or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. However, dental caries was significantly inversely associated with the prevalence of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis only among children with a positive parental allergic history: The adjusted odds ratio was 0.84 (95% confidence interval: 0.72, 0.99). CONCLUSIONS: The present findings do not support the hypothesis that dental caries was protective against allergic diseases. However, a parental allergic history may affect the association between dental caries and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. SN - 1532-4303 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18972298/Dental_caries_and_allergic_disorders_in_Japanese_children:_the_Ryukyus_Child_Health_Study_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02770900802252119 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -