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Training effects outweigh effects of single-session conventional rTMS and theta burst stimulation in PD patients.
Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2009 May; 23(4):373-81.NN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Focal single-session repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the primary motor cortex has been claimed to be capable of improving motor function in Parkinson's disease.

OBJECTIVE

The authors sought to determine which type of rTMS protocol holds the highest potential for future therapeutic application.

METHODS

Twenty-two patients with Parkinson's disease received 5 different rTMS protocols on 5 consecutive days in a pseudorandomized and counterbalanced order either in the defined OFF condition or with their usual medication. The protocols tested in the present study included 2 conventional rTMS protocols (0.5 and 10 Hz) as well as the recently introduced theta burst stimulation (cTBS, iTBS) and a sham condition. Cortical excitability, motor performance (pointing movement, pronation-supination, Purdue Pegboard Test, walking), and mood were assessed before and after each session.

RESULTS

The authors observed motor training from days 1 to 4, particularly in the group on dopaminergic medication. None of the rTMS paradigms excelled placebo stimulation. The only exception was the Purdue Pegboard Test, in which all active stimulation paradigms yielded slightly stronger effects than sham stimulation.

CONCLUSIONS

Within a single session, no clinically relevant difference in the rTMS protocols could be detected. Training effects outweigh and may have masked rTMS effects, particularly in the group on dopaminergic mediation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18978029

Citation

Rothkegel, Holger, et al. "Training Effects Outweigh Effects of Single-session Conventional rTMS and Theta Burst Stimulation in PD Patients." Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 23, no. 4, 2009, pp. 373-81.
Rothkegel H, Sommer M, Rammsayer T, et al. Training effects outweigh effects of single-session conventional rTMS and theta burst stimulation in PD patients. Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2009;23(4):373-81.
Rothkegel, H., Sommer, M., Rammsayer, T., Trenkwalder, C., & Paulus, W. (2009). Training effects outweigh effects of single-session conventional rTMS and theta burst stimulation in PD patients. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 23(4), 373-81. https://doi.org/10.1177/1545968308322842
Rothkegel H, et al. Training Effects Outweigh Effects of Single-session Conventional rTMS and Theta Burst Stimulation in PD Patients. Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2009;23(4):373-81. PubMed PMID: 18978029.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Training effects outweigh effects of single-session conventional rTMS and theta burst stimulation in PD patients. AU - Rothkegel,Holger, AU - Sommer,Martin, AU - Rammsayer,Thomas, AU - Trenkwalder,Claudia, AU - Paulus,Walter, Y1 - 2008/10/31/ PY - 2008/11/4/pubmed PY - 2009/7/17/medline PY - 2008/11/4/entrez SP - 373 EP - 81 JF - Neurorehabilitation and neural repair JO - Neurorehabil Neural Repair VL - 23 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Focal single-session repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the primary motor cortex has been claimed to be capable of improving motor function in Parkinson's disease. OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to determine which type of rTMS protocol holds the highest potential for future therapeutic application. METHODS: Twenty-two patients with Parkinson's disease received 5 different rTMS protocols on 5 consecutive days in a pseudorandomized and counterbalanced order either in the defined OFF condition or with their usual medication. The protocols tested in the present study included 2 conventional rTMS protocols (0.5 and 10 Hz) as well as the recently introduced theta burst stimulation (cTBS, iTBS) and a sham condition. Cortical excitability, motor performance (pointing movement, pronation-supination, Purdue Pegboard Test, walking), and mood were assessed before and after each session. RESULTS: The authors observed motor training from days 1 to 4, particularly in the group on dopaminergic medication. None of the rTMS paradigms excelled placebo stimulation. The only exception was the Purdue Pegboard Test, in which all active stimulation paradigms yielded slightly stronger effects than sham stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Within a single session, no clinically relevant difference in the rTMS protocols could be detected. Training effects outweigh and may have masked rTMS effects, particularly in the group on dopaminergic mediation. SN - 1545-9683 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18978029/Training_effects_outweigh_effects_of_single_session_conventional_rTMS_and_theta_burst_stimulation_in_PD_patients_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1545968308322842?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -