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Right hemispheric dominance for echo suppression.
Neuropsychologia. 2009 Jan; 47(2):465-72.N

Abstract

When two sounds are presented sequentially within a short delay (approximately 10ms), the listener perceives a single auditory event, the location of which is dominated by the directional information conveyed by the leading sound (the precedence effect, PE). The PE is not always instantaneous, but has been shown to build-up across repetitions of lead-lag pairs. Here, we investigated the contributions of lateralization cue (interaural time and intensity differences; ITD and IID, respectively) and the side of lateralization of the leading sound on the spatio-temporal activity associated with the PE. We applied electrical neuroimaging analyses to compare auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in response to physically identical click pairs presented early and late within a stimulus train and perceived as two segregated events or as one fused auditory event. Significant topographic AEP modulations associated with the PE were observed over the 70-117ms post-stimulus period, with one topography characterizing fused perceptions and another segregated perceptions. The specific pattern of effects varied as a function of lateralization cue and the lateralization of the leading sound. The PE for ITD stimuli built-up during the stimulus train irrespective of the lateralization of the leading sound. The PE for IID stimuli did not exhibit build-up over the course of the stimulus train, but instead was generally affected by the lateralization of the leading sound. Source estimations further suggested that bilateral temporal networks were engaged when perceptions were segregated, whereas fused perceptions resulted in decreased activity in left temporal and increased activity in right temporo-parietal cortices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuropsychology and Neurorehabilitation Service, Vaudois University Hospital Center, Lausanne, Switzerland. Lucas.spierer@chuv.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18983863

Citation

Spierer, Lucas, et al. "Right Hemispheric Dominance for Echo Suppression." Neuropsychologia, vol. 47, no. 2, 2009, pp. 465-72.
Spierer L, Bourquin NM, Tardif E, et al. Right hemispheric dominance for echo suppression. Neuropsychologia. 2009;47(2):465-72.
Spierer, L., Bourquin, N. M., Tardif, E., Murray, M. M., & Clarke, S. (2009). Right hemispheric dominance for echo suppression. Neuropsychologia, 47(2), 465-72. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2008.09.022
Spierer L, et al. Right Hemispheric Dominance for Echo Suppression. Neuropsychologia. 2009;47(2):465-72. PubMed PMID: 18983863.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Right hemispheric dominance for echo suppression. AU - Spierer,Lucas, AU - Bourquin,Nathalie M-P, AU - Tardif,Eric, AU - Murray,Micah M, AU - Clarke,Stephanie, Y1 - 2008/10/15/ PY - 2008/06/13/received PY - 2008/08/12/revised PY - 2008/09/30/accepted PY - 2008/11/6/pubmed PY - 2009/4/14/medline PY - 2008/11/6/entrez SP - 465 EP - 72 JF - Neuropsychologia JO - Neuropsychologia VL - 47 IS - 2 N2 - When two sounds are presented sequentially within a short delay (approximately 10ms), the listener perceives a single auditory event, the location of which is dominated by the directional information conveyed by the leading sound (the precedence effect, PE). The PE is not always instantaneous, but has been shown to build-up across repetitions of lead-lag pairs. Here, we investigated the contributions of lateralization cue (interaural time and intensity differences; ITD and IID, respectively) and the side of lateralization of the leading sound on the spatio-temporal activity associated with the PE. We applied electrical neuroimaging analyses to compare auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in response to physically identical click pairs presented early and late within a stimulus train and perceived as two segregated events or as one fused auditory event. Significant topographic AEP modulations associated with the PE were observed over the 70-117ms post-stimulus period, with one topography characterizing fused perceptions and another segregated perceptions. The specific pattern of effects varied as a function of lateralization cue and the lateralization of the leading sound. The PE for ITD stimuli built-up during the stimulus train irrespective of the lateralization of the leading sound. The PE for IID stimuli did not exhibit build-up over the course of the stimulus train, but instead was generally affected by the lateralization of the leading sound. Source estimations further suggested that bilateral temporal networks were engaged when perceptions were segregated, whereas fused perceptions resulted in decreased activity in left temporal and increased activity in right temporo-parietal cortices. SN - 0028-3932 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18983863/Right_hemispheric_dominance_for_echo_suppression_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0028-3932(08)00388-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -