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Aggressive and prosocial children's emotion attributions and moral reasoning.
Aggress Behav. 2009 Jan-Feb; 35(1):90-102.AB

Abstract

Aggressive and prosocial children's emotion attributions and moral reasoning were investigated. Participants were 235 kindergarten children (M=6.2 years) and 136 elementary-school children (M=7.6 years) who were selected as aggressive or prosocial based on (kindergarten) teacher ratings. The children were asked to evaluate hypothetical rule violations, attribute emotions they would feel in the role of the victimizer, and justify their responses. Compared with younger prosocial children, younger aggressive children attributed fewer negative emotions and were more likely to provide sanction-oriented justifications when evaluating rule violations negatively. Furthermore, age-, gender- and context-effects in moral development occurred. The context-effects included both effects of transgression type (i.e., prosocial morality vs. fairness) on emotion attributions and moral reasoning and the effects of the context of moral evaluation and emotion attribution on moral reasoning. Findings are discussed in terms of the role of emotion attributions and moral reasoning as antecedents of children's aggressive and prosocial behavior.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Jacobs Center for Productive Youth Development, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. malti@jacobscenter.uzh.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18985747

Citation

Malti, Tina, et al. "Aggressive and Prosocial Children's Emotion Attributions and Moral Reasoning." Aggressive Behavior, vol. 35, no. 1, 2009, pp. 90-102.
Malti T, Gasser L, Buchmann M. Aggressive and prosocial children's emotion attributions and moral reasoning. Aggress Behav. 2009;35(1):90-102.
Malti, T., Gasser, L., & Buchmann, M. (2009). Aggressive and prosocial children's emotion attributions and moral reasoning. Aggressive Behavior, 35(1), 90-102. https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.20289
Malti T, Gasser L, Buchmann M. Aggressive and Prosocial Children's Emotion Attributions and Moral Reasoning. Aggress Behav. 2009 Jan-Feb;35(1):90-102. PubMed PMID: 18985747.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Aggressive and prosocial children's emotion attributions and moral reasoning. AU - Malti,Tina, AU - Gasser,Luciano, AU - Buchmann,Marlis, PY - 2008/11/6/entrez PY - 2008/11/6/pubmed PY - 2009/3/12/medline SP - 90 EP - 102 JF - Aggressive behavior JO - Aggress Behav VL - 35 IS - 1 N2 - Aggressive and prosocial children's emotion attributions and moral reasoning were investigated. Participants were 235 kindergarten children (M=6.2 years) and 136 elementary-school children (M=7.6 years) who were selected as aggressive or prosocial based on (kindergarten) teacher ratings. The children were asked to evaluate hypothetical rule violations, attribute emotions they would feel in the role of the victimizer, and justify their responses. Compared with younger prosocial children, younger aggressive children attributed fewer negative emotions and were more likely to provide sanction-oriented justifications when evaluating rule violations negatively. Furthermore, age-, gender- and context-effects in moral development occurred. The context-effects included both effects of transgression type (i.e., prosocial morality vs. fairness) on emotion attributions and moral reasoning and the effects of the context of moral evaluation and emotion attribution on moral reasoning. Findings are discussed in terms of the role of emotion attributions and moral reasoning as antecedents of children's aggressive and prosocial behavior. SN - 1098-2337 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18985747/Aggressive_and_prosocial_children's_emotion_attributions_and_moral_reasoning_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.20289 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -