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Immigration to the USA and risk for mood and anxiety disorders: variation by origin and age at immigration.
Psychol Med. 2009 Jul; 39(7):1117-27.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Risk for mood and anxiety disorders associated with US-nativity may vary across immigrant groups.

METHOD

Using data from the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), we examined the association of lifetime risk for mood and anxiety disorders with US-nativity and age at immigration across seven subgroups of the US population defined by country or region of ancestral origin: Mexico, Puerto-Rico, Cuba, Central and South America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and Africa and the Caribbean. Discrete time survival models were used to compare lifetime risk between the US-born, immigrants who arrived in the USA prior to the age of 13 years and immigrants who arrived in the USA at the age of 13 years or older.

RESULTS

The association of risk for mood and anxiety disorders with US-nativity varies significantly across ancestral origin groups (p<0.001). Among people from Mexico, Eastern Europe, and Africa or the Caribbean, risk for disorders is lower relative to the US-born among immigrants who arrived at the age of 13 years or higher (odds ratios in the range 0.34-0.49) but not among immigrants who arrived prior to the age of 13 years. There is no association between US-nativity and risk for disorder among people from Western Europe and Puerto Rico.

CONCLUSIONS

Low risk among immigrants relative to the US-born is limited to groups among whom risk for mood and anxiety disorder is low in immigrants who spent their pre-adolescent years outside of the USA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Reducing Health Disparities, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. jabreslau@ucdavis.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19000338

Citation

Breslau, J, et al. "Immigration to the USA and Risk for Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Variation By Origin and Age at Immigration." Psychological Medicine, vol. 39, no. 7, 2009, pp. 1117-27.
Breslau J, Borges G, Hagar Y, et al. Immigration to the USA and risk for mood and anxiety disorders: variation by origin and age at immigration. Psychol Med. 2009;39(7):1117-27.
Breslau, J., Borges, G., Hagar, Y., Tancredi, D., & Gilman, S. (2009). Immigration to the USA and risk for mood and anxiety disorders: variation by origin and age at immigration. Psychological Medicine, 39(7), 1117-27. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291708004698
Breslau J, et al. Immigration to the USA and Risk for Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Variation By Origin and Age at Immigration. Psychol Med. 2009;39(7):1117-27. PubMed PMID: 19000338.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Immigration to the USA and risk for mood and anxiety disorders: variation by origin and age at immigration. AU - Breslau,J, AU - Borges,G, AU - Hagar,Y, AU - Tancredi,D, AU - Gilman,S, Y1 - 2008/11/12/ PY - 2008/11/13/pubmed PY - 2009/8/29/medline PY - 2008/11/13/entrez SP - 1117 EP - 27 JF - Psychological medicine JO - Psychol Med VL - 39 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Risk for mood and anxiety disorders associated with US-nativity may vary across immigrant groups. METHOD: Using data from the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), we examined the association of lifetime risk for mood and anxiety disorders with US-nativity and age at immigration across seven subgroups of the US population defined by country or region of ancestral origin: Mexico, Puerto-Rico, Cuba, Central and South America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and Africa and the Caribbean. Discrete time survival models were used to compare lifetime risk between the US-born, immigrants who arrived in the USA prior to the age of 13 years and immigrants who arrived in the USA at the age of 13 years or older. RESULTS: The association of risk for mood and anxiety disorders with US-nativity varies significantly across ancestral origin groups (p<0.001). Among people from Mexico, Eastern Europe, and Africa or the Caribbean, risk for disorders is lower relative to the US-born among immigrants who arrived at the age of 13 years or higher (odds ratios in the range 0.34-0.49) but not among immigrants who arrived prior to the age of 13 years. There is no association between US-nativity and risk for disorder among people from Western Europe and Puerto Rico. CONCLUSIONS: Low risk among immigrants relative to the US-born is limited to groups among whom risk for mood and anxiety disorder is low in immigrants who spent their pre-adolescent years outside of the USA. SN - 1469-8978 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19000338/Immigration_to_the_USA_and_risk_for_mood_and_anxiety_disorders:_variation_by_origin_and_age_at_immigration_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0033291708004698/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -