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An FFP:PRBC transfusion ratio >/=1:1.5 is associated with a lower risk of mortality after massive transfusion.
J Trauma. 2008 Nov; 65(5):986-93.JT

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The detrimental effects of coagulopathy, hypothermia, and acidosis are well described as markers for mortality after traumatic hemorrhage. Recent military experience suggests that a high fresh frozen plasma (FFP):packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion ratio improves outcome; however, the appropriate ratio these transfusion products should be given remains to be established in a civilian trauma population.

METHODS

Data were obtained from a multicenter prospective cohort study evaluating clinical outcomes in blunt injured adults with hemorrhagic shock. Those patients who required >/=8 units PRBCs within the first 12 hours postinjury were analyzed (n = 415).

RESULTS

Patients who received transfusion products in >/=1:1.50 FFP:PRBC ratio (high F:P ratio, n = 102) versus <1:1.50 FFP:PRBC ratio (low F:P, n = 313) required significantly less blood transfusion at 24 hours (16 +/- 9 units vs. 22 +/- 17 units, p = 0.001). Crude mortality differences between the groups did not reach statistical significance (high F:P 28% vs. low F:P 35%, p = 0.202); however, there was a significant difference in early (24 hour) mortality (high F:P 3.9% vs. low F:P 12.8%, p = 0.012). Cox proportional hazard regression revealed that receiving a high F:P ratio was independently associated with 52% lower risk of mortality after adjusting for important confounders (HR 0.48, p = 0.002, 95% CI 0.3-0.8). A high F:P ratio was not associated with a higher risk of organ failure or nosocomial infection, however, was associated with almost a twofold higher risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome, after controlling for important confounders.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients requiring >/=8 units of blood after serious blunt injury, an FFP:PRBC transfusion ratio >/=1:1.5 was associated with a significant lower risk of mortality but a higher risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mortality risk reduction was most relevant to mortality within the first 48 hours from the time of injury. These results suggest that the mortality risk associated with an FFP:PRBC ratio <1:1.5 may occur early, possibly secondary to ongoing coagulopathy and hemorrhage. This analysis provides further justification for the prospective trial investigation into the optimal FFP:PRBC ratio required in massive transfusion practice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Surgery and Trauma, Departments of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. sperryjl@upmc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19001962

Citation

Sperry, Jason L., et al. "An FFP:PRBC Transfusion Ratio >/=1:1.5 Is Associated With a Lower Risk of Mortality After Massive Transfusion." The Journal of Trauma, vol. 65, no. 5, 2008, pp. 986-93.
Sperry JL, Ochoa JB, Gunn SR, et al. An FFP:PRBC transfusion ratio >/=1:1.5 is associated with a lower risk of mortality after massive transfusion. J Trauma. 2008;65(5):986-93.
Sperry, J. L., Ochoa, J. B., Gunn, S. R., Alarcon, L. H., Minei, J. P., Cuschieri, J., Rosengart, M. R., Maier, R. V., Billiar, T. R., Peitzman, A. B., & Moore, E. E. (2008). An FFP:PRBC transfusion ratio >/=1:1.5 is associated with a lower risk of mortality after massive transfusion. The Journal of Trauma, 65(5), 986-93. https://doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e3181878028
Sperry JL, et al. An FFP:PRBC Transfusion Ratio >/=1:1.5 Is Associated With a Lower Risk of Mortality After Massive Transfusion. J Trauma. 2008;65(5):986-93. PubMed PMID: 19001962.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An FFP:PRBC transfusion ratio >/=1:1.5 is associated with a lower risk of mortality after massive transfusion. AU - Sperry,Jason L, AU - Ochoa,Juan B, AU - Gunn,Scott R, AU - Alarcon,Louis H, AU - Minei,Joseph P, AU - Cuschieri,Joseph, AU - Rosengart,Matthew R, AU - Maier,Ronald V, AU - Billiar,Timothy R, AU - Peitzman,Andrew B, AU - Moore,Ernest E, AU - ,, PY - 2008/11/13/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/11/13/entrez SP - 986 EP - 93 JF - The Journal of trauma JO - J Trauma VL - 65 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The detrimental effects of coagulopathy, hypothermia, and acidosis are well described as markers for mortality after traumatic hemorrhage. Recent military experience suggests that a high fresh frozen plasma (FFP):packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion ratio improves outcome; however, the appropriate ratio these transfusion products should be given remains to be established in a civilian trauma population. METHODS: Data were obtained from a multicenter prospective cohort study evaluating clinical outcomes in blunt injured adults with hemorrhagic shock. Those patients who required >/=8 units PRBCs within the first 12 hours postinjury were analyzed (n = 415). RESULTS: Patients who received transfusion products in >/=1:1.50 FFP:PRBC ratio (high F:P ratio, n = 102) versus <1:1.50 FFP:PRBC ratio (low F:P, n = 313) required significantly less blood transfusion at 24 hours (16 +/- 9 units vs. 22 +/- 17 units, p = 0.001). Crude mortality differences between the groups did not reach statistical significance (high F:P 28% vs. low F:P 35%, p = 0.202); however, there was a significant difference in early (24 hour) mortality (high F:P 3.9% vs. low F:P 12.8%, p = 0.012). Cox proportional hazard regression revealed that receiving a high F:P ratio was independently associated with 52% lower risk of mortality after adjusting for important confounders (HR 0.48, p = 0.002, 95% CI 0.3-0.8). A high F:P ratio was not associated with a higher risk of organ failure or nosocomial infection, however, was associated with almost a twofold higher risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome, after controlling for important confounders. CONCLUSIONS: In patients requiring >/=8 units of blood after serious blunt injury, an FFP:PRBC transfusion ratio >/=1:1.5 was associated with a significant lower risk of mortality but a higher risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mortality risk reduction was most relevant to mortality within the first 48 hours from the time of injury. These results suggest that the mortality risk associated with an FFP:PRBC ratio <1:1.5 may occur early, possibly secondary to ongoing coagulopathy and hemorrhage. This analysis provides further justification for the prospective trial investigation into the optimal FFP:PRBC ratio required in massive transfusion practice. SN - 1529-8809 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19001962/An_FFP:PRBC_transfusion_ratio_>/=1:1_5_is_associated_with_a_lower_risk_of_mortality_after_massive_transfusion_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e3181878028 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -