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The role of antioxidants and vitamin A in ovarian cancer: results from the Women's Health Initiative.

Abstract

Antioxidant nutrients and carotenoids have been inconsistently associated with ovarian cancer risk. We examined the relationship between intake of dietary and supplemental antioxidant nutrients including vitamins C, E, and selenium as well as carotenoids and vitamin A and ovarian cancer in 133,614 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study. Dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire, and ovarian cancer endpoints were centrally adjudicated. Cox regression models were used to estimate the risk for invasive ovarian cancer in relation to each of the antioxidant nutrients and carotenoids under consideration using models stratified for a WHI study component. A total of 451 cases of invasive ovarian cancer were diagnosed over 8.3 yr of follow-up. Dietary intake at baseline was not significantly different for cases vs. controls. Cases reported greater intake of supplemental vitamin C (358.0 mg/day vs. 291.6 mg/day, respectively; P = 0.024). Multivariate modeling (P for trend) of the risk for developing ovarian cancer did not suggest any significant relationships among dietary factors and ovarian cancer risk. The results from this prospective study of well-nourished, postmenopausal women suggest that intake of dietary antioxidants, carotenoids, and vitamin A are not associated with a reduction in ovarian cancer risk.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutritional Sciences and Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA. cthomson@email.arizona.edu

    , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    Nutrition and cancer 60:6 2008 pg 710-9

    MeSH

    Aged
    Antioxidants
    Ascorbic Acid
    Carotenoids
    Female
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Ovarian Neoplasms
    Prospective Studies
    Vitamin A

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19005970

    Citation

    Thomson, Cynthia A., et al. "The Role of Antioxidants and Vitamin a in Ovarian Cancer: Results From the Women's Health Initiative." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 60, no. 6, 2008, pp. 710-9.
    Thomson CA, Neuhouser ML, Shikany JM, et al. The role of antioxidants and vitamin A in ovarian cancer: results from the Women's Health Initiative. Nutr Cancer. 2008;60(6):710-9.
    Thomson, C. A., Neuhouser, M. L., Shikany, J. M., Caan, B. J., Monk, B. J., Mossavar-Rahmani, Y., ... Anderson, G. L. (2008). The role of antioxidants and vitamin A in ovarian cancer: results from the Women's Health Initiative. Nutrition and Cancer, 60(6), pp. 710-9. doi:10.1080/01635580802233983.
    Thomson CA, et al. The Role of Antioxidants and Vitamin a in Ovarian Cancer: Results From the Women's Health Initiative. Nutr Cancer. 2008;60(6):710-9. PubMed PMID: 19005970.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The role of antioxidants and vitamin A in ovarian cancer: results from the Women's Health Initiative. AU - Thomson,Cynthia A, AU - Neuhouser,Marian L, AU - Shikany,James M, AU - Caan,Bette J, AU - Monk,Bradley J, AU - Mossavar-Rahmani,Yasmin, AU - Sarto,Gloria, AU - Parker,Linda M, AU - Modugno,Francesmary, AU - Anderson,Garnet L, PY - 2008/11/14/pubmed PY - 2009/2/13/medline PY - 2008/11/14/entrez SP - 710 EP - 9 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 60 IS - 6 N2 - Antioxidant nutrients and carotenoids have been inconsistently associated with ovarian cancer risk. We examined the relationship between intake of dietary and supplemental antioxidant nutrients including vitamins C, E, and selenium as well as carotenoids and vitamin A and ovarian cancer in 133,614 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study. Dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire, and ovarian cancer endpoints were centrally adjudicated. Cox regression models were used to estimate the risk for invasive ovarian cancer in relation to each of the antioxidant nutrients and carotenoids under consideration using models stratified for a WHI study component. A total of 451 cases of invasive ovarian cancer were diagnosed over 8.3 yr of follow-up. Dietary intake at baseline was not significantly different for cases vs. controls. Cases reported greater intake of supplemental vitamin C (358.0 mg/day vs. 291.6 mg/day, respectively; P = 0.024). Multivariate modeling (P for trend) of the risk for developing ovarian cancer did not suggest any significant relationships among dietary factors and ovarian cancer risk. The results from this prospective study of well-nourished, postmenopausal women suggest that intake of dietary antioxidants, carotenoids, and vitamin A are not associated with a reduction in ovarian cancer risk. SN - 1532-7914 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19005970/The_role_of_antioxidants_and_vitamin_A_in_ovarian_cancer:_results_from_the_Women's_Health_Initiative_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635580802233983 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -