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Nutrient and fiber intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma.

Abstract

This study examines the association between nutrient and fiber intake and the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Between 1994 and 1997 in 8 Canadian provinces, mailed questionnaires were completed by 1,138 incident, histologically confirmed cases of RCC and 5,039 population controls. Measurement included information on socioeconomic status, lifestyle habits, and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire provided data on eating habits 2 yr before data collection. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were derived through unconditional logistic regression. Intakes of total fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, trans-fat, and cholesterol were associated with the risk of RCC; the ORs for the highest vs. the lowest quartile were 1.67, 1.53 and 1.46, 1.31, and 1.48, respectively. The positive association was apparently stronger in women, overweight or obese, and never smokers. Sucrose was related to the risk of RCC. High fiber intake was inversely associated with RCC risk. No association was found with intake of total protein and polyunsaturated fat, n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and total carbohydrates. The results were consistent across strata of sex, tobacco, and BMI. The findings suggest that a diet low in fats and cholesterol and rich in fiber could favorably affect the risk of RCC.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Jinfu_hu@phac-aspc.gc.ca

    , , , ,

    Source

    Nutrition and cancer 60:6 2008 pg 720-8

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Carcinoma, Renal Cell
    Case-Control Studies
    Dietary Fats
    Dietary Fiber
    Female
    Humans
    Kidney Neoplasms
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Risk

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19005971

    Citation

    Hu, Jinfu, et al. "Nutrient and Fiber Intake and Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 60, no. 6, 2008, pp. 720-8.
    Hu J, La Vecchia C, DesMeules M, et al. Nutrient and fiber intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma. Nutr Cancer. 2008;60(6):720-8.
    Hu, J., La Vecchia, C., DesMeules, M., Negri, E., & Mery, L. (2008). Nutrient and fiber intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma. Nutrition and Cancer, 60(6), pp. 720-8. doi:10.1080/01635580802283335.
    Hu J, et al. Nutrient and Fiber Intake and Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma. Nutr Cancer. 2008;60(6):720-8. PubMed PMID: 19005971.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrient and fiber intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma. AU - Hu,Jinfu, AU - La Vecchia,Carlo, AU - DesMeules,Marie, AU - Negri,Eva, AU - Mery,Les, AU - ,, PY - 2008/11/14/pubmed PY - 2009/2/13/medline PY - 2008/11/14/entrez SP - 720 EP - 8 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 60 IS - 6 N2 - This study examines the association between nutrient and fiber intake and the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Between 1994 and 1997 in 8 Canadian provinces, mailed questionnaires were completed by 1,138 incident, histologically confirmed cases of RCC and 5,039 population controls. Measurement included information on socioeconomic status, lifestyle habits, and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire provided data on eating habits 2 yr before data collection. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were derived through unconditional logistic regression. Intakes of total fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, trans-fat, and cholesterol were associated with the risk of RCC; the ORs for the highest vs. the lowest quartile were 1.67, 1.53 and 1.46, 1.31, and 1.48, respectively. The positive association was apparently stronger in women, overweight or obese, and never smokers. Sucrose was related to the risk of RCC. High fiber intake was inversely associated with RCC risk. No association was found with intake of total protein and polyunsaturated fat, n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and total carbohydrates. The results were consistent across strata of sex, tobacco, and BMI. The findings suggest that a diet low in fats and cholesterol and rich in fiber could favorably affect the risk of RCC. SN - 1532-7914 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19005971/Nutrient_and_fiber_intake_and_risk_of_renal_cell_carcinoma_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635580802283335 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -