Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Proinflammatory markers, insulin sensitivity, and cardiometabolic risk factors in treated HIV infection.
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Jan; 17(1):53-9.O

Abstract

Treated HIV infection and HIV-lipoatrophy increases risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Circulating inflammatory molecules may, in part, explain this increased risk. This study examined circulating inflammatory molecules in treated HIV infection in relation to insulin sensitivity, lipids total body, and intramyocellular fat, compared to insulin-resistant obesity (an index group at high risk of diabetes). Detailed metabolic phenotypes were measured in 20 treated HIV-infected men (with and without subcutaneous lipoatrophy) vs. 26 insulin-resistant obese men (IR-O, n = 26), including inflammatory molecules, insulin sensitivity, total body fat (TBF), visceral fat (visceral adipose tissue (VAT)), and intramyocellular lipid (IMCL). C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in treated HIV were similar to those in IR-O, despite lower TBF and greater insulin sensitivity in treated HIV. In HIV-lipoatrophy, CRP was higher than that found in IR-O. Adiponectin was similar between treated HIV and IR-O, but significantly lower in those with HIV-lipoatrophy. In treated HIV, subjects with higher CRP had significantly higher total cholesterol, VAT, and IMCL. In treated HIV, subjects with lower adiponectin had significantly lower HDL and higher triglycerides, glucose, VAT, and IMCL. In conclusion, a proinflammatory milieu equivalent to that of insulin-resistant obesity characterizes lean men with treated HIV infection, worse in those with subcutaneous lipoatrophy. These factors may contribute to the accelerated diabetogenesis and cardiac risk observed in treated HIV infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

St Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. k.samaras@garvan.org.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19008869

Citation

Samaras, Katherine, et al. "Proinflammatory Markers, Insulin Sensitivity, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Treated HIV Infection." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 17, no. 1, 2009, pp. 53-9.
Samaras K, Gan SK, Peake PW, et al. Proinflammatory markers, insulin sensitivity, and cardiometabolic risk factors in treated HIV infection. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009;17(1):53-9.
Samaras, K., Gan, S. K., Peake, P. W., Carr, A., & Campbell, L. V. (2009). Proinflammatory markers, insulin sensitivity, and cardiometabolic risk factors in treated HIV infection. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 17(1), 53-9. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2008.500
Samaras K, et al. Proinflammatory Markers, Insulin Sensitivity, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Treated HIV Infection. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009;17(1):53-9. PubMed PMID: 19008869.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Proinflammatory markers, insulin sensitivity, and cardiometabolic risk factors in treated HIV infection. AU - Samaras,Katherine, AU - Gan,Seng K, AU - Peake,Phillip W, AU - Carr,Andrew, AU - Campbell,Lesley V, Y1 - 2008/11/13/ PY - 2008/11/15/pubmed PY - 2009/3/25/medline PY - 2008/11/15/entrez SP - 53 EP - 9 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - Treated HIV infection and HIV-lipoatrophy increases risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Circulating inflammatory molecules may, in part, explain this increased risk. This study examined circulating inflammatory molecules in treated HIV infection in relation to insulin sensitivity, lipids total body, and intramyocellular fat, compared to insulin-resistant obesity (an index group at high risk of diabetes). Detailed metabolic phenotypes were measured in 20 treated HIV-infected men (with and without subcutaneous lipoatrophy) vs. 26 insulin-resistant obese men (IR-O, n = 26), including inflammatory molecules, insulin sensitivity, total body fat (TBF), visceral fat (visceral adipose tissue (VAT)), and intramyocellular lipid (IMCL). C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in treated HIV were similar to those in IR-O, despite lower TBF and greater insulin sensitivity in treated HIV. In HIV-lipoatrophy, CRP was higher than that found in IR-O. Adiponectin was similar between treated HIV and IR-O, but significantly lower in those with HIV-lipoatrophy. In treated HIV, subjects with higher CRP had significantly higher total cholesterol, VAT, and IMCL. In treated HIV, subjects with lower adiponectin had significantly lower HDL and higher triglycerides, glucose, VAT, and IMCL. In conclusion, a proinflammatory milieu equivalent to that of insulin-resistant obesity characterizes lean men with treated HIV infection, worse in those with subcutaneous lipoatrophy. These factors may contribute to the accelerated diabetogenesis and cardiac risk observed in treated HIV infection. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19008869/Proinflammatory_markers_insulin_sensitivity_and_cardiometabolic_risk_factors_in_treated_HIV_infection_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2008.500 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -