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Using early standardized language measures to predict later language and early reading outcomes in children at high risk for language-learning impairments.
J Learn Disabil. 2009 Jan-Feb; 42(1):61-75.JL

Abstract

The aim of the study was to examine the profiles of children with a family history (FH+) of language-learning impairments (LLI) and a control group of children with no reported family history of LLI (FH-) and identify which language constructs (receptive or expressive) and which ages (2 or 3 years) are related to expressive and receptive language abilities, phonological awareness, and reading abilities at ages 5 and 7 years. Participants included 99 children (40 FH+ and 59 FH-) who received a standardized neuropsychological battery at 2, 3, 5, and 7 years of age. As a group, the FH+ children had significantly lower scores on all language measures at 2 and 3 years, on selected language and phonological awareness measures at 5 years, and on phonological awareness and nonword reading at 7 years. Language comprehension at 3 years was the best predictor of later language and early reading for both groups. These results support past work suggesting that children with a positive family history of LLI are at greater risk for future language and reading problems through their preschool and early school-age years. Furthermore, language comprehension in the early years is a strong predictor of future language-learning status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rutgers University, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19011122

Citation

Flax, Judy F., et al. "Using Early Standardized Language Measures to Predict Later Language and Early Reading Outcomes in Children at High Risk for Language-learning Impairments." Journal of Learning Disabilities, vol. 42, no. 1, 2009, pp. 61-75.
Flax JF, Realpe-Bonilla T, Roesler C, et al. Using early standardized language measures to predict later language and early reading outcomes in children at high risk for language-learning impairments. J Learn Disabil. 2009;42(1):61-75.
Flax, J. F., Realpe-Bonilla, T., Roesler, C., Choudhury, N., & Benasich, A. (2009). Using early standardized language measures to predict later language and early reading outcomes in children at high risk for language-learning impairments. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 42(1), 61-75. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022219408326215
Flax JF, et al. Using Early Standardized Language Measures to Predict Later Language and Early Reading Outcomes in Children at High Risk for Language-learning Impairments. J Learn Disabil. 2009 Jan-Feb;42(1):61-75. PubMed PMID: 19011122.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Using early standardized language measures to predict later language and early reading outcomes in children at high risk for language-learning impairments. AU - Flax,Judy F, AU - Realpe-Bonilla,Teresa, AU - Roesler,Cynthia, AU - Choudhury,Naseem, AU - Benasich,April, Y1 - 2008/11/14/ PY - 2008/11/18/pubmed PY - 2009/2/3/medline PY - 2008/11/18/entrez SP - 61 EP - 75 JF - Journal of learning disabilities JO - J Learn Disabil VL - 42 IS - 1 N2 - The aim of the study was to examine the profiles of children with a family history (FH+) of language-learning impairments (LLI) and a control group of children with no reported family history of LLI (FH-) and identify which language constructs (receptive or expressive) and which ages (2 or 3 years) are related to expressive and receptive language abilities, phonological awareness, and reading abilities at ages 5 and 7 years. Participants included 99 children (40 FH+ and 59 FH-) who received a standardized neuropsychological battery at 2, 3, 5, and 7 years of age. As a group, the FH+ children had significantly lower scores on all language measures at 2 and 3 years, on selected language and phonological awareness measures at 5 years, and on phonological awareness and nonword reading at 7 years. Language comprehension at 3 years was the best predictor of later language and early reading for both groups. These results support past work suggesting that children with a positive family history of LLI are at greater risk for future language and reading problems through their preschool and early school-age years. Furthermore, language comprehension in the early years is a strong predictor of future language-learning status. SN - 0022-2194 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19011122/Using_early_standardized_language_measures_to_predict_later_language_and_early_reading_outcomes_in_children_at_high_risk_for_language_learning_impairments_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022219408326215?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -