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Hepatitis E, Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcers in workers exposed to sewage: a prospective cohort study.
Occup Environ Med. 2009 Jan; 66(1):45-50.OE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Workers exposed to sewage may have an increased risk of infection by Helicobacter pylori and hepatitis E virus (HEV).

OBJECTIVES

To assess the incidence of clinical hepatitis E and peptic ulcers and the seroconversion rate of antibodies to H pylori and HEV in workers with and without sewage exposure.

METHODS

332 workers exposed to sewage and a control group of 446 municipal manual workers (61% participation rate) entered a prospective cohort study with clinical examination and determination of antibodies to H pylori and HEV (immunoglobulins G and A or G and M, respectively). Survival curves were examined with log rank tests and Cox regressions. Travelling to endemic areas, socioeconomic level, age, country of childhood, number of siblings, and personal protective equipment were considered as the main confounding factors.

RESULTS

Incidence of clinical hepatitis E was not increased in sewage workers. One peptic ulcer and three eradications were recorded in sewage workers compared with no peptic ulcers and 12 eradications in control workers. Incidence rates of approximately 0.01, 0.10, and 0.15 seroconversion/person-year for hepatitis E, H pylori IgG and H pylori IgA, respectively, were found in both exposed and non-exposed workers. Survival curves did not show an increased risk in sewage workers and no association with any exposure indicator was found. Sensitivity analyses did not alter these results.

CONCLUSIONS

Sewage does not appear to be a source of occupational infection by H pylori or HEV in trained sewage workers with personal protective equipment working in a region with good sanitation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Biostatistics, ISPM, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19017699

Citation

Tschopp, A, et al. "Hepatitis E, Helicobacter Pylori and Peptic Ulcers in Workers Exposed to Sewage: a Prospective Cohort Study." Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 66, no. 1, 2009, pp. 45-50.
Tschopp A, Joller H, Jeggli S, et al. Hepatitis E, Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcers in workers exposed to sewage: a prospective cohort study. Occup Environ Med. 2009;66(1):45-50.
Tschopp, A., Joller, H., Jeggli, S., Widmeier, S., Steffen, R., Hilfiker, S., & Hotz, P. (2009). Hepatitis E, Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcers in workers exposed to sewage: a prospective cohort study. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 66(1), 45-50. https://doi.org/10.1136/oem.2007.038166
Tschopp A, et al. Hepatitis E, Helicobacter Pylori and Peptic Ulcers in Workers Exposed to Sewage: a Prospective Cohort Study. Occup Environ Med. 2009;66(1):45-50. PubMed PMID: 19017699.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hepatitis E, Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcers in workers exposed to sewage: a prospective cohort study. AU - Tschopp,A, AU - Joller,H, AU - Jeggli,S, AU - Widmeier,S, AU - Steffen,R, AU - Hilfiker,S, AU - Hotz,P, Y1 - 2008/11/18/ PY - 2008/11/20/pubmed PY - 2009/2/3/medline PY - 2008/11/20/entrez SP - 45 EP - 50 JF - Occupational and environmental medicine JO - Occup Environ Med VL - 66 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Workers exposed to sewage may have an increased risk of infection by Helicobacter pylori and hepatitis E virus (HEV). OBJECTIVES: To assess the incidence of clinical hepatitis E and peptic ulcers and the seroconversion rate of antibodies to H pylori and HEV in workers with and without sewage exposure. METHODS: 332 workers exposed to sewage and a control group of 446 municipal manual workers (61% participation rate) entered a prospective cohort study with clinical examination and determination of antibodies to H pylori and HEV (immunoglobulins G and A or G and M, respectively). Survival curves were examined with log rank tests and Cox regressions. Travelling to endemic areas, socioeconomic level, age, country of childhood, number of siblings, and personal protective equipment were considered as the main confounding factors. RESULTS: Incidence of clinical hepatitis E was not increased in sewage workers. One peptic ulcer and three eradications were recorded in sewage workers compared with no peptic ulcers and 12 eradications in control workers. Incidence rates of approximately 0.01, 0.10, and 0.15 seroconversion/person-year for hepatitis E, H pylori IgG and H pylori IgA, respectively, were found in both exposed and non-exposed workers. Survival curves did not show an increased risk in sewage workers and no association with any exposure indicator was found. Sensitivity analyses did not alter these results. CONCLUSIONS: Sewage does not appear to be a source of occupational infection by H pylori or HEV in trained sewage workers with personal protective equipment working in a region with good sanitation. SN - 1470-7926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19017699/Hepatitis_E_Helicobacter_pylori_and_peptic_ulcers_in_workers_exposed_to_sewage:_a_prospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://oem.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19017699 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -