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The importance of Alzheimer disease assessment scale-cognitive part in predicting progress for amnestic mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2008 Dec; 21(4):261-7.JG

Abstract

The aim of this study was to verify the usefulness of Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), in screening participants at risk of developing Alzheimer disease (AD) among populations with amnestic mild cognitive impairment(aMCI). 98 outpatients with aMCI were recruited. Participants were revaluated after 1 year: 44 (44.9%) were progressed to AD (progressors), while 54 (55.1%) did not convert (nonprogressors MCI). At baseline, cognitive performances were more impaired in progressors assessed by MMSE and by a neuropsychological battery. When tested with the ADAS-Cog subscale, the 2 groups of participants at baseline, progressors, and nonprogressors MCI, were significantly different regarding total score, memory, and nonmemory subitems. Considering a cutoff of 9.5 total score, adjusted for education, ADAS-Cog subscale showed a good performance (area under the curve = 0.67; sensitivity = 0.62%; specificity = 0.73%) in predicting conversion from aMCI to AD. Progressors aMCI were characterized at baseline by a greater cognitive impairment. ADAS-Cog subscale is a useful and brief cognitive assessment tool to screen aMCI participants converting to AD within 1 year.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Geriatric Research Group, University of Brescia, via Romanino 1, Brescia, Italy. lrozzini@iol.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19017783

Citation

Rozzini, Luca, et al. "The Importance of Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive Part in Predicting Progress for Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer Disease." Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, vol. 21, no. 4, 2008, pp. 261-7.
Rozzini L, Vicini Chilovi B, Bertoletti E, et al. The importance of Alzheimer disease assessment scale-cognitive part in predicting progress for amnestic mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease. J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2008;21(4):261-7.
Rozzini, L., Vicini Chilovi, B., Bertoletti, E., Conti, M., Delrio, I., Trabucchi, M., & Padovani, A. (2008). The importance of Alzheimer disease assessment scale-cognitive part in predicting progress for amnestic mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 21(4), 261-7. https://doi.org/10.1177/0891988708324940
Rozzini L, et al. The Importance of Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive Part in Predicting Progress for Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer Disease. J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2008;21(4):261-7. PubMed PMID: 19017783.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The importance of Alzheimer disease assessment scale-cognitive part in predicting progress for amnestic mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease. AU - Rozzini,Luca, AU - Vicini Chilovi,Barbara, AU - Bertoletti,Erik, AU - Conti,Marta, AU - Delrio,Ilenia, AU - Trabucchi,Marco, AU - Padovani,Alessandro, PY - 2008/11/20/pubmed PY - 2009/1/7/medline PY - 2008/11/20/entrez SP - 261 EP - 7 JF - Journal of geriatric psychiatry and neurology JO - J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - The aim of this study was to verify the usefulness of Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), in screening participants at risk of developing Alzheimer disease (AD) among populations with amnestic mild cognitive impairment(aMCI). 98 outpatients with aMCI were recruited. Participants were revaluated after 1 year: 44 (44.9%) were progressed to AD (progressors), while 54 (55.1%) did not convert (nonprogressors MCI). At baseline, cognitive performances were more impaired in progressors assessed by MMSE and by a neuropsychological battery. When tested with the ADAS-Cog subscale, the 2 groups of participants at baseline, progressors, and nonprogressors MCI, were significantly different regarding total score, memory, and nonmemory subitems. Considering a cutoff of 9.5 total score, adjusted for education, ADAS-Cog subscale showed a good performance (area under the curve = 0.67; sensitivity = 0.62%; specificity = 0.73%) in predicting conversion from aMCI to AD. Progressors aMCI were characterized at baseline by a greater cognitive impairment. ADAS-Cog subscale is a useful and brief cognitive assessment tool to screen aMCI participants converting to AD within 1 year. SN - 0891-9887 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19017783/The_importance_of_Alzheimer_disease_assessment_scale_cognitive_part_in_predicting_progress_for_amnestic_mild_cognitive_impairment_to_Alzheimer_disease_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0891988708324940?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -