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Role of iron in carcinogenesis: cancer as a ferrotoxic disease.
Cancer Sci. 2009 Jan; 100(1):9-16.CS

Abstract

Iron is abundant universally. During the evolutionary processes, humans have selected iron as a carrier of oxygen inside the body. However, iron works as a double-edged sword, and its excess is a risk for cancer, presumably via generation of reactive oxygen species. Thus far, pathological conditions such as hemochromatosis, chronic viral hepatitis B and C, exposure to asbestos fibers, as well as endometriosis have been recognized as iron overload-associated risks for human cancer. Indeed, iron is carcinogenic in animal experiments. These reports unexpectedly revealed that there are target genes in iron-induced carcinogenesis and that iron-catalyzed oxidative DNA damage is not random in vivo. Several iron transporters and hepcidin, a peptide hormone regulating iron metabolism, were discovered in the past decade. Furthermore, a recent epidemiological study reported that iron reduction by phlebotomy decreased cancer risk in the apparently normal population. These results warrant reconsideration of the role of iron in carcinogenesis and suggest that fine control of body iron stores would be a wise strategy for cancer prevention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya 466-8550, Japan. toyokuni@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19018762

Citation

Toyokuni, Shinya. "Role of Iron in Carcinogenesis: Cancer as a Ferrotoxic Disease." Cancer Science, vol. 100, no. 1, 2009, pp. 9-16.
Toyokuni S. Role of iron in carcinogenesis: cancer as a ferrotoxic disease. Cancer Sci. 2009;100(1):9-16.
Toyokuni, S. (2009). Role of iron in carcinogenesis: cancer as a ferrotoxic disease. Cancer Science, 100(1), 9-16. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1349-7006.2008.01001.x
Toyokuni S. Role of Iron in Carcinogenesis: Cancer as a Ferrotoxic Disease. Cancer Sci. 2009;100(1):9-16. PubMed PMID: 19018762.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of iron in carcinogenesis: cancer as a ferrotoxic disease. A1 - Toyokuni,Shinya, Y1 - 2008/10/23/ PY - 2008/11/21/pubmed PY - 2009/1/24/medline PY - 2008/11/21/entrez SP - 9 EP - 16 JF - Cancer science JO - Cancer Sci VL - 100 IS - 1 N2 - Iron is abundant universally. During the evolutionary processes, humans have selected iron as a carrier of oxygen inside the body. However, iron works as a double-edged sword, and its excess is a risk for cancer, presumably via generation of reactive oxygen species. Thus far, pathological conditions such as hemochromatosis, chronic viral hepatitis B and C, exposure to asbestos fibers, as well as endometriosis have been recognized as iron overload-associated risks for human cancer. Indeed, iron is carcinogenic in animal experiments. These reports unexpectedly revealed that there are target genes in iron-induced carcinogenesis and that iron-catalyzed oxidative DNA damage is not random in vivo. Several iron transporters and hepcidin, a peptide hormone regulating iron metabolism, were discovered in the past decade. Furthermore, a recent epidemiological study reported that iron reduction by phlebotomy decreased cancer risk in the apparently normal population. These results warrant reconsideration of the role of iron in carcinogenesis and suggest that fine control of body iron stores would be a wise strategy for cancer prevention. SN - 1349-7006 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19018762/Role_of_iron_in_carcinogenesis:_cancer_as_a_ferrotoxic_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1349-7006.2008.01001.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -