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Application of the QFD as a design approach to ensure comfort in using hand tools: can the design team complete the House of Quality appropriately?
Appl Ergon. 2009 May; 40(3):519-26.AE

Abstract

Quality Function Deployment is proposed as an effective design method to integrate ergonomics needs and comfort into hand tool design because it explicitly addresses the translation of customer needs into engineering characteristics. A crucial step during QFD concerns the linking of engineering characteristics to customer needs in the House of Quality by the design team. It is generally assumed (looking at all the QFD success stories) that design teams can accurately predict the correlations between customer needs and engineering characteristics (also referred to as "Whats"/"Hows" correlations). This paper explicitly tests this assumption by comparing the "Whats"/"Hows" correlations estimated by a design team with those observed in a systematic user evaluation study, which has not been done before. Testing the assumption is important, because inaccurate estimates may lead to ergonomically ineffective (re)design of hand tools and a waste of company resources. Results revealed that the design team's correlation estimates were not as accurate as is generally assumed. Twenty-five percent of the estimates differed significantly with those observed in the user evaluation study. Thus, QFD is a useful method to assist design teams in designing ergonomically more comfortable hand tools, but only on the condition that the correlations between customer needs and engineering characteristics are validated, preferably by means of a systematic user evaluation study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

TNO Quality of Life, PO Box 718, 2130 AS Hoofddorp, The Netherlands. lottie.kuijt@tno.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19019346

Citation

Kuijt-Evers, L F M., et al. "Application of the QFD as a Design Approach to Ensure Comfort in Using Hand Tools: Can the Design Team Complete the House of Quality Appropriately?" Applied Ergonomics, vol. 40, no. 3, 2009, pp. 519-26.
Kuijt-Evers LF, Morel KP, Eikelenberg NL, et al. Application of the QFD as a design approach to ensure comfort in using hand tools: can the design team complete the House of Quality appropriately? Appl Ergon. 2009;40(3):519-26.
Kuijt-Evers, L. F., Morel, K. P., Eikelenberg, N. L., & Vink, P. (2009). Application of the QFD as a design approach to ensure comfort in using hand tools: can the design team complete the House of Quality appropriately? Applied Ergonomics, 40(3), 519-26. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2008.09.009
Kuijt-Evers LF, et al. Application of the QFD as a Design Approach to Ensure Comfort in Using Hand Tools: Can the Design Team Complete the House of Quality Appropriately. Appl Ergon. 2009;40(3):519-26. PubMed PMID: 19019346.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Application of the QFD as a design approach to ensure comfort in using hand tools: can the design team complete the House of Quality appropriately? AU - Kuijt-Evers,L F M, AU - Morel,K P N, AU - Eikelenberg,N L W, AU - Vink,P, Y1 - 2008/11/18/ PY - 2007/09/12/received PY - 2008/09/05/revised PY - 2008/09/09/accepted PY - 2008/11/21/pubmed PY - 2009/5/27/medline PY - 2008/11/21/entrez SP - 519 EP - 26 JF - Applied ergonomics JO - Appl Ergon VL - 40 IS - 3 N2 - Quality Function Deployment is proposed as an effective design method to integrate ergonomics needs and comfort into hand tool design because it explicitly addresses the translation of customer needs into engineering characteristics. A crucial step during QFD concerns the linking of engineering characteristics to customer needs in the House of Quality by the design team. It is generally assumed (looking at all the QFD success stories) that design teams can accurately predict the correlations between customer needs and engineering characteristics (also referred to as "Whats"/"Hows" correlations). This paper explicitly tests this assumption by comparing the "Whats"/"Hows" correlations estimated by a design team with those observed in a systematic user evaluation study, which has not been done before. Testing the assumption is important, because inaccurate estimates may lead to ergonomically ineffective (re)design of hand tools and a waste of company resources. Results revealed that the design team's correlation estimates were not as accurate as is generally assumed. Twenty-five percent of the estimates differed significantly with those observed in the user evaluation study. Thus, QFD is a useful method to assist design teams in designing ergonomically more comfortable hand tools, but only on the condition that the correlations between customer needs and engineering characteristics are validated, preferably by means of a systematic user evaluation study. SN - 1872-9126 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19019346/Application_of_the_QFD_as_a_design_approach_to_ensure_comfort_in_using_hand_tools:_can_the_design_team_complete_the_House_of_Quality_appropriately L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003-6870(08)00148-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -