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Neonatal chest wall afferents and regulation of respiration.

Abstract

We have studied two groups of eight preterm infants, relating chest wall afferent information to respiratory timing. Rib cage and abdominal motion were monitored by magnetometers and flow and tidal volume via a face mask. In the first group, studies were done in REM sleep when spontaneously occurring distortion of the rib cage occurred and a significant linear relationship between the rate of distortion of the chest wall and shortening of the inspiratory time (Ti) was found in all infants. Reduction in this distortion by the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or continuous negative pressure at the body surface (CNeg) was associated with a significant (P less than 0.01) lengthening of Ti. Absence of changes in Ti when pressure was applied in quiet sleep suggested that lung volume or chemical changes were not involved. In the second group of infants we artificially generated the afferent inflow by using vibratory stimuli applied in one intercostal interspace and produced a significant (P less than 0.05) shortening in Ti. We suggest that the distortion of the rib cage in REM sleep generates afferent information from intercostal muscle spindles that is related to the rate of distortion and this, via a supraspinal reflex, inhibits phrenic motoneuron discharge. It may then be of importance in the etiology of apneic episodes in these infants. Applied pressure may be of benefit because it reduces an inhibitory afferent inflow.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

190205

Citation

Hagan, R, et al. "Neonatal Chest Wall Afferents and Regulation of Respiration." Journal of Applied Physiology: Respiratory, Environmental and Exercise Physiology, vol. 42, no. 3, 1977, pp. 362-7.
Hagan R, Bryan AC, Bryan MH, et al. Neonatal chest wall afferents and regulation of respiration. J Appl Physiol Respir Environ Exerc Physiol. 1977;42(3):362-7.
Hagan, R., Bryan, A. C., Bryan, M. H., & Gulston, G. (1977). Neonatal chest wall afferents and regulation of respiration. Journal of Applied Physiology: Respiratory, Environmental and Exercise Physiology, 42(3), pp. 362-7.
Hagan R, et al. Neonatal Chest Wall Afferents and Regulation of Respiration. J Appl Physiol Respir Environ Exerc Physiol. 1977;42(3):362-7. PubMed PMID: 190205.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neonatal chest wall afferents and regulation of respiration. AU - Hagan,R, AU - Bryan,A C, AU - Bryan,M H, AU - Gulston,G, PY - 1977/3/1/pubmed PY - 1977/3/1/medline PY - 1977/3/1/entrez SP - 362 EP - 7 JF - Journal of applied physiology: respiratory, environmental and exercise physiology JO - J Appl Physiol Respir Environ Exerc Physiol VL - 42 IS - 3 N2 - We have studied two groups of eight preterm infants, relating chest wall afferent information to respiratory timing. Rib cage and abdominal motion were monitored by magnetometers and flow and tidal volume via a face mask. In the first group, studies were done in REM sleep when spontaneously occurring distortion of the rib cage occurred and a significant linear relationship between the rate of distortion of the chest wall and shortening of the inspiratory time (Ti) was found in all infants. Reduction in this distortion by the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or continuous negative pressure at the body surface (CNeg) was associated with a significant (P less than 0.01) lengthening of Ti. Absence of changes in Ti when pressure was applied in quiet sleep suggested that lung volume or chemical changes were not involved. In the second group of infants we artificially generated the afferent inflow by using vibratory stimuli applied in one intercostal interspace and produced a significant (P less than 0.05) shortening in Ti. We suggest that the distortion of the rib cage in REM sleep generates afferent information from intercostal muscle spindles that is related to the rate of distortion and this, via a supraspinal reflex, inhibits phrenic motoneuron discharge. It may then be of importance in the etiology of apneic episodes in these infants. Applied pressure may be of benefit because it reduces an inhibitory afferent inflow. SN - 0161-7567 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/190205/Neonatal_chest_wall_afferents_and_regulation_of_respiration_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -