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Dietary folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 and risk of sporadic colorectal cancer.
J Nutr 2008; 138(12):2372-8JN

Abstract

Adequate intake of folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 may prevent aberrant DNA methylation and thereby protect against colorectal cancer (CRC). However, previous epidemiological studies investigating associations between dietary intakes of these nutrients and CRC have been inconsistent. We investigated the associations between intakes of folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 and CRC risk, accounting for the sublocalization of the tumor. Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (n = 120,852), 2349 cases and 4168 subcohort members were available for data analyses from a follow-up period of 13.3 y after baseline. Gender-specific adjusted incidence rate ratios (RR) were calculated over quintiles of dietary intake in case-cohort analyses. Folate intake was not associated with CRC risk in either men or women. However, methionine was associated with decreased risk of proximal colon cancer among men (RR = 0.57 for highest vs. lowest quintile of intake; P-trend = 0.03) and rectal cancer among women (highest vs. lowest quintile; RR = 0.45; P-trend = 0.05). Riboflavin tended to be associated with decreased proximal colon cancer risk among women (RR = 0.61; P-trend = 0.07). Conversely, there was a strong positive association between vitamin B-6 and rectal cancer among women (RR = 3.57; P-trend = 0.01). Our findings suggest that relatively high methionine intake may protect against proximal colon cancer in men and rectal cancer in women but that folate may not have a protective effect. This is the 2nd prospective cohort study in which vitamin B-6 intake was associated with increased risk of rectal tumors in women, which might suggest that this vitamin enhances rectal cancer in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. stefan.devogel@epid.unimaas.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19022960

Citation

de Vogel, Stefan, et al. "Dietary Folate, Methionine, Riboflavin, and Vitamin B-6 and Risk of Sporadic Colorectal Cancer." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 138, no. 12, 2008, pp. 2372-8.
de Vogel S, Dindore V, van Engeland M, et al. Dietary folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 and risk of sporadic colorectal cancer. J Nutr. 2008;138(12):2372-8.
de Vogel, S., Dindore, V., van Engeland, M., Goldbohm, R. A., van den Brandt, P. A., & Weijenberg, M. P. (2008). Dietary folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 and risk of sporadic colorectal cancer. The Journal of Nutrition, 138(12), pp. 2372-8. doi:10.3945/jn.108.091157.
de Vogel S, et al. Dietary Folate, Methionine, Riboflavin, and Vitamin B-6 and Risk of Sporadic Colorectal Cancer. J Nutr. 2008;138(12):2372-8. PubMed PMID: 19022960.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 and risk of sporadic colorectal cancer. AU - de Vogel,Stefan, AU - Dindore,Vasundhara, AU - van Engeland,Manon, AU - Goldbohm,R Alexandra, AU - van den Brandt,Piet A, AU - Weijenberg,Matty P, PY - 2008/11/22/pubmed PY - 2009/1/7/medline PY - 2008/11/22/entrez SP - 2372 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 138 IS - 12 N2 - Adequate intake of folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 may prevent aberrant DNA methylation and thereby protect against colorectal cancer (CRC). However, previous epidemiological studies investigating associations between dietary intakes of these nutrients and CRC have been inconsistent. We investigated the associations between intakes of folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 and CRC risk, accounting for the sublocalization of the tumor. Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (n = 120,852), 2349 cases and 4168 subcohort members were available for data analyses from a follow-up period of 13.3 y after baseline. Gender-specific adjusted incidence rate ratios (RR) were calculated over quintiles of dietary intake in case-cohort analyses. Folate intake was not associated with CRC risk in either men or women. However, methionine was associated with decreased risk of proximal colon cancer among men (RR = 0.57 for highest vs. lowest quintile of intake; P-trend = 0.03) and rectal cancer among women (highest vs. lowest quintile; RR = 0.45; P-trend = 0.05). Riboflavin tended to be associated with decreased proximal colon cancer risk among women (RR = 0.61; P-trend = 0.07). Conversely, there was a strong positive association between vitamin B-6 and rectal cancer among women (RR = 3.57; P-trend = 0.01). Our findings suggest that relatively high methionine intake may protect against proximal colon cancer in men and rectal cancer in women but that folate may not have a protective effect. This is the 2nd prospective cohort study in which vitamin B-6 intake was associated with increased risk of rectal tumors in women, which might suggest that this vitamin enhances rectal cancer in women. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19022960/Dietary_folate_methionine_riboflavin_and_vitamin_B_6_and_risk_of_sporadic_colorectal_cancer_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.108.091157 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -