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Excessive body iron stores are not associated with risk of coronary heart disease in women.
J Nutr. 2008 Dec; 138(12):2436-41.JN

Abstract

The positive association between body iron stores and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) initially observed among a Finnish male population has not been corroborated by studies conducted in other populations. The soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR):ferritin ratio has been suggested to be a better index than ferritin to measure body iron stores. Because sTfR is sensitive to iron deficiency, this ratio can distinguish individuals with similar ferritin levels with respect to their iron status. To evaluate this novel index in relation to CHD risk, we prospectively identified and confirmed 242 incident CHD cases and randomly selected 483 controls matched for age, smoking, and fasting status among women that provided blood samples in the Nurses' Health Study during 9 y of follow-up. In both crude and multivariate analyses, neither the sTfR:ferritin ratio nor ferritin was significantly associated with an elevated risk of CHD. After multivariate adjustment for established and potential CHD risk factors, compared with women in the lowest quartile of the sTfR:ferritin ratio, women in the 2nd to 4th quartiles had relative risks (RR) (95% CI) of 1.39 (0.82, 2.36), 1.12 (0.66, 1.91), and 1.13 (0.65, 1.97; P-trend = 0.61), respectively. The multivariate RR (95% CI) for ferritin were 1.05 (0.62, 1.77), 1.19 (0.69, 2.03), and 1.05 (0.60, 1.85; P-trend = 0.90) across quartiles. Our data do not support the hypothesis that excessive body iron stores are associated with risk of CHD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. qisun@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19022969

Citation

Sun, Qi, et al. "Excessive Body Iron Stores Are Not Associated With Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 138, no. 12, 2008, pp. 2436-41.
Sun Q, Ma J, Rifai N, et al. Excessive body iron stores are not associated with risk of coronary heart disease in women. J Nutr. 2008;138(12):2436-41.
Sun, Q., Ma, J., Rifai, N., Franco, O. H., Rexrode, K. M., & Hu, F. B. (2008). Excessive body iron stores are not associated with risk of coronary heart disease in women. The Journal of Nutrition, 138(12), 2436-41. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.108.097766
Sun Q, et al. Excessive Body Iron Stores Are Not Associated With Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women. J Nutr. 2008;138(12):2436-41. PubMed PMID: 19022969.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Excessive body iron stores are not associated with risk of coronary heart disease in women. AU - Sun,Qi, AU - Ma,Jing, AU - Rifai,Nader, AU - Franco,Oscar H, AU - Rexrode,Kathryn M, AU - Hu,Frank B, PY - 2008/11/22/pubmed PY - 2009/1/7/medline PY - 2008/11/22/entrez SP - 2436 EP - 41 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 138 IS - 12 N2 - The positive association between body iron stores and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) initially observed among a Finnish male population has not been corroborated by studies conducted in other populations. The soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR):ferritin ratio has been suggested to be a better index than ferritin to measure body iron stores. Because sTfR is sensitive to iron deficiency, this ratio can distinguish individuals with similar ferritin levels with respect to their iron status. To evaluate this novel index in relation to CHD risk, we prospectively identified and confirmed 242 incident CHD cases and randomly selected 483 controls matched for age, smoking, and fasting status among women that provided blood samples in the Nurses' Health Study during 9 y of follow-up. In both crude and multivariate analyses, neither the sTfR:ferritin ratio nor ferritin was significantly associated with an elevated risk of CHD. After multivariate adjustment for established and potential CHD risk factors, compared with women in the lowest quartile of the sTfR:ferritin ratio, women in the 2nd to 4th quartiles had relative risks (RR) (95% CI) of 1.39 (0.82, 2.36), 1.12 (0.66, 1.91), and 1.13 (0.65, 1.97; P-trend = 0.61), respectively. The multivariate RR (95% CI) for ferritin were 1.05 (0.62, 1.77), 1.19 (0.69, 2.03), and 1.05 (0.60, 1.85; P-trend = 0.90) across quartiles. Our data do not support the hypothesis that excessive body iron stores are associated with risk of CHD. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19022969/Excessive_body_iron_stores_are_not_associated_with_risk_of_coronary_heart_disease_in_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.108.097766 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -