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Cortical sources of resting EEG rhythms in mild cognitive impairment and subjective memory complaint.
Neurobiol Aging. 2010 Oct; 31(10):1787-98.NA

Abstract

Are cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms altered in amnesic and non-amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), subjective memory complaint (SMC), and healthy elderly (Nold) subjects? Eyes-closed resting EEG was recorded in 79 Nold, 53 SMC, 51 non-amnesic MCI, and 92 amnesic MCI subjects. EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), beta 2 (20-30 Hz) and gamma (30-40 Hz). Cortical EEG sources were estimated by standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). Results showed that (i) the frontal delta sources were greater in amplitude in the amnesic MCI and SMC subjects than in the Nold subjects (p<0.05-0.01); (ii) the parietal and occipital theta sources were lower in amplitude in the SMC subjects than in the Nold subjects (p<0.046); (iii) the occipital theta sources were greater in amplitude in the amnesic MCI subjects than in the SMC and non-amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.02-0.01); (iv) the parietal and occipital alpha 1 sources were greater in amplitude in the Nold subjects than in the SMC, non-amnesic MCI and amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.00001); (v) the central alpha 1 sources were lower in amplitude in the SMC subjects than in the non-amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.002); (vi) the occipital alpha 1 sources were greater in amplitude in the SMC subjects than in the amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.0003); (vii) the parietal and occipital alpha 2 sources were greater in amplitude in the Nold subjects than in the non-amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.041-0.0004); (viii) the occipital alpha 2 sources were greater in the SMC subjects than in the non-amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.02). These results suggest that amnesic MCI and SMC subjects present some of the typical alterations of brain neural synchronization as revealed by resting cortical EEG rhythms in Alzheimer's disease patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Foggia, Italy. c.babiloni@unifg.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19027196

Citation

Babiloni, Claudio, et al. "Cortical Sources of Resting EEG Rhythms in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Subjective Memory Complaint." Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 31, no. 10, 2010, pp. 1787-98.
Babiloni C, Visser PJ, Frisoni G, et al. Cortical sources of resting EEG rhythms in mild cognitive impairment and subjective memory complaint. Neurobiol Aging. 2010;31(10):1787-98.
Babiloni, C., Visser, P. J., Frisoni, G., De Deyn, P. P., Bresciani, L., Jelic, V., Nagels, G., Rodriguez, G., Rossini, P. M., Vecchio, F., Colombo, D., Verhey, F., Wahlund, L. O., & Nobili, F. (2010). Cortical sources of resting EEG rhythms in mild cognitive impairment and subjective memory complaint. Neurobiology of Aging, 31(10), 1787-98. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2008.09.020
Babiloni C, et al. Cortical Sources of Resting EEG Rhythms in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Subjective Memory Complaint. Neurobiol Aging. 2010;31(10):1787-98. PubMed PMID: 19027196.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cortical sources of resting EEG rhythms in mild cognitive impairment and subjective memory complaint. AU - Babiloni,Claudio, AU - Visser,Pieter Jelle, AU - Frisoni,Giovanni, AU - De Deyn,Peter Paul, AU - Bresciani,Lorena, AU - Jelic,Vesna, AU - Nagels,Guy, AU - Rodriguez,Guido, AU - Rossini,Paolo M, AU - Vecchio,Fabrizio, AU - Colombo,Danilo, AU - Verhey,Frans, AU - Wahlund,Lars-Olof, AU - Nobili,Flavio, Y1 - 2008/11/21/ PY - 2007/10/05/received PY - 2008/09/12/revised PY - 2008/09/30/accepted PY - 2008/11/26/pubmed PY - 2010/12/25/medline PY - 2008/11/26/entrez SP - 1787 EP - 98 JF - Neurobiology of aging JO - Neurobiol Aging VL - 31 IS - 10 N2 - Are cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms altered in amnesic and non-amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), subjective memory complaint (SMC), and healthy elderly (Nold) subjects? Eyes-closed resting EEG was recorded in 79 Nold, 53 SMC, 51 non-amnesic MCI, and 92 amnesic MCI subjects. EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), beta 2 (20-30 Hz) and gamma (30-40 Hz). Cortical EEG sources were estimated by standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). Results showed that (i) the frontal delta sources were greater in amplitude in the amnesic MCI and SMC subjects than in the Nold subjects (p<0.05-0.01); (ii) the parietal and occipital theta sources were lower in amplitude in the SMC subjects than in the Nold subjects (p<0.046); (iii) the occipital theta sources were greater in amplitude in the amnesic MCI subjects than in the SMC and non-amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.02-0.01); (iv) the parietal and occipital alpha 1 sources were greater in amplitude in the Nold subjects than in the SMC, non-amnesic MCI and amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.00001); (v) the central alpha 1 sources were lower in amplitude in the SMC subjects than in the non-amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.002); (vi) the occipital alpha 1 sources were greater in amplitude in the SMC subjects than in the amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.0003); (vii) the parietal and occipital alpha 2 sources were greater in amplitude in the Nold subjects than in the non-amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.041-0.0004); (viii) the occipital alpha 2 sources were greater in the SMC subjects than in the non-amnesic MCI subjects (p<0.02). These results suggest that amnesic MCI and SMC subjects present some of the typical alterations of brain neural synchronization as revealed by resting cortical EEG rhythms in Alzheimer's disease patients. SN - 1558-1497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19027196/Cortical_sources_of_resting_EEG_rhythms_in_mild_cognitive_impairment_and_subjective_memory_complaint_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -