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Genotoxic and reproductive effects of an industrially contaminated soil on the earthworm Eisenia fetida.
Environ Mol Mutagen. 2009 Jan; 50(1):60-7.EM

Abstract

Polluted soil sampled from a former coking plant in Lorraine (France) was studied for its genotoxicity and reproductive effects on the Eisenia fetida earthworm. Genotoxicity was investigated by means of the single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay on the coelomocytes of earthworms after 4 and 10 days of exposure to the soil. DNA damage and a decline in the number of coelomocytes extruded from earthworms were observed at coking plant soil concentrations of 20 and 40% (w/w) in ISO soil. These soil concentrations had previously been shown to significantly reduce cocoon and juvenile productions after 28 and 56 days of earthworm exposure, respectively. The results showed that genotoxic pollutants in the tested soil were still bioavailable despite the age of the contaminated soil. Similar values of the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) corresponding to 10% of the contaminated soil and of the lowest soil concentration tested inducing effects (LOEC) corresponding to 20% of the contaminated soil were obtained from reproductive and genotoxicity endpoints. Among the soil pollutants measured, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appeared to be the most likely source of the genotoxicity recorded, although effects of metals could not be excluded. Measurement of genotoxicity in earthworms could complement the existing standardized tests used in the ecotoxicological assessment of the risk associated with contaminated soils.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CNRS UMR 7146, Laboratory I.E.B.E., University Paul Verlaine, France. bonnard@univ-metz.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19031410

Citation

Bonnard, Marc, et al. "Genotoxic and Reproductive Effects of an Industrially Contaminated Soil On the Earthworm Eisenia Fetida." Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, vol. 50, no. 1, 2009, pp. 60-7.
Bonnard M, Eom IC, Morel JL, et al. Genotoxic and reproductive effects of an industrially contaminated soil on the earthworm Eisenia fetida. Environ Mol Mutagen. 2009;50(1):60-7.
Bonnard, M., Eom, I. C., Morel, J. L., & Vasseur, P. (2009). Genotoxic and reproductive effects of an industrially contaminated soil on the earthworm Eisenia fetida. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, 50(1), 60-7. https://doi.org/10.1002/em.20436
Bonnard M, et al. Genotoxic and Reproductive Effects of an Industrially Contaminated Soil On the Earthworm Eisenia Fetida. Environ Mol Mutagen. 2009;50(1):60-7. PubMed PMID: 19031410.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genotoxic and reproductive effects of an industrially contaminated soil on the earthworm Eisenia fetida. AU - Bonnard,Marc, AU - Eom,Ig-Chun, AU - Morel,Jean-Louis, AU - Vasseur,Paule, PY - 2008/11/26/pubmed PY - 2009/1/23/medline PY - 2008/11/26/entrez SP - 60 EP - 7 JF - Environmental and molecular mutagenesis JO - Environ Mol Mutagen VL - 50 IS - 1 N2 - Polluted soil sampled from a former coking plant in Lorraine (France) was studied for its genotoxicity and reproductive effects on the Eisenia fetida earthworm. Genotoxicity was investigated by means of the single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay on the coelomocytes of earthworms after 4 and 10 days of exposure to the soil. DNA damage and a decline in the number of coelomocytes extruded from earthworms were observed at coking plant soil concentrations of 20 and 40% (w/w) in ISO soil. These soil concentrations had previously been shown to significantly reduce cocoon and juvenile productions after 28 and 56 days of earthworm exposure, respectively. The results showed that genotoxic pollutants in the tested soil were still bioavailable despite the age of the contaminated soil. Similar values of the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) corresponding to 10% of the contaminated soil and of the lowest soil concentration tested inducing effects (LOEC) corresponding to 20% of the contaminated soil were obtained from reproductive and genotoxicity endpoints. Among the soil pollutants measured, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appeared to be the most likely source of the genotoxicity recorded, although effects of metals could not be excluded. Measurement of genotoxicity in earthworms could complement the existing standardized tests used in the ecotoxicological assessment of the risk associated with contaminated soils. SN - 1098-2280 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19031410/Genotoxic_and_reproductive_effects_of_an_industrially_contaminated_soil_on_the_earthworm_Eisenia_fetida_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/em.20436 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -