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Nutritional habits of Flemish adolescent sprint athletes.

Abstract

PURPOSE AND METHODS

To investigate dietary habits of Flemish adolescent track and field athletes using a 7-d weighed-food record. Besides adequacy for growth, development, and physical performance, dietary health aspects were considered.

RESULTS

Twenty-nine girls and 31 boys, with minimum 2 yr of track and field training practice, were recruited. All participants had daily breakfast (girls 22.5% +/- 5.5% of total energy intake [TEI]; boys 19.8% +/- 7.3%). Fruit in girls and juices and sports drinks in boys were consumed mostly between meals (girls 21.3% +/- 8.1% of TEI; boys 24.3% +/- 10.1%). Soft drinks contributed considerably to energy intake between meals in both sexes. Protein intake (1.5 +/- 0.3 g . kg-1 . d-1 for both sexes) was within the recommended daily intake (RDI) for strength athletes. Mean daily carbohydrate intake in girls was lower than in boys (girls 5.1 +/- 1.1 g/kg; boys 6.0 +/- 0.9 g/kg), with mono- and disaccharides contributing 26% to TEI in both sexes. Total fat intake was above 30% of TEI in more than half the participants, and only 10 participants had a saturated-fat intake below 10% of TEI. Fiber intake (girls 23.7 +/- 7.9 g; boys 29.1 +/- 11.2 g) was far below the Belgian RDI. Intake of vitamins and minerals were generally low, despite micronutrient supplementation in 37.5% of the participants.

CONCLUSION

Few athletes reached all nutrient RDIs. Unhealthy food habits with regard to refined sugars, fat, and micronutrients were observed. These adolescent sprinters should be encouraged to consume more nonsweetened beverages, fruits, and vegetables.

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Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Dept. of Human Biometry and Biomechanics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.

, ,

Source

MeSH

Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Belgium
Carbonated Beverages
Child
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Fats
Dietary Fiber
Dietary Proteins
Energy Intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Minerals
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Running
Vegetables
Vitamins

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19033612

Citation

Aerenhouts, Dirk, et al. "Nutritional Habits of Flemish Adolescent Sprint Athletes." International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, vol. 18, no. 5, 2008, pp. 509-23.
Aerenhouts D, Hebbelinck M, Poortmans JR, et al. Nutritional habits of Flemish adolescent sprint athletes. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2008;18(5):509-23.
Aerenhouts, D., Hebbelinck, M., Poortmans, J. R., & Clarys, P. (2008). Nutritional habits of Flemish adolescent sprint athletes. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 18(5), pp. 509-23.
Aerenhouts D, et al. Nutritional Habits of Flemish Adolescent Sprint Athletes. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2008;18(5):509-23. PubMed PMID: 19033612.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutritional habits of Flemish adolescent sprint athletes. AU - Aerenhouts,Dirk, AU - Hebbelinck,Marcel, AU - Poortmans,Jacques R, AU - Clarys,Peter, PY - 2008/11/27/pubmed PY - 2009/1/30/medline PY - 2008/11/27/entrez SP - 509 EP - 23 JF - International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism JO - Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab VL - 18 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE AND METHODS: To investigate dietary habits of Flemish adolescent track and field athletes using a 7-d weighed-food record. Besides adequacy for growth, development, and physical performance, dietary health aspects were considered. RESULTS: Twenty-nine girls and 31 boys, with minimum 2 yr of track and field training practice, were recruited. All participants had daily breakfast (girls 22.5% +/- 5.5% of total energy intake [TEI]; boys 19.8% +/- 7.3%). Fruit in girls and juices and sports drinks in boys were consumed mostly between meals (girls 21.3% +/- 8.1% of TEI; boys 24.3% +/- 10.1%). Soft drinks contributed considerably to energy intake between meals in both sexes. Protein intake (1.5 +/- 0.3 g . kg-1 . d-1 for both sexes) was within the recommended daily intake (RDI) for strength athletes. Mean daily carbohydrate intake in girls was lower than in boys (girls 5.1 +/- 1.1 g/kg; boys 6.0 +/- 0.9 g/kg), with mono- and disaccharides contributing 26% to TEI in both sexes. Total fat intake was above 30% of TEI in more than half the participants, and only 10 participants had a saturated-fat intake below 10% of TEI. Fiber intake (girls 23.7 +/- 7.9 g; boys 29.1 +/- 11.2 g) was far below the Belgian RDI. Intake of vitamins and minerals were generally low, despite micronutrient supplementation in 37.5% of the participants. CONCLUSION: Few athletes reached all nutrient RDIs. Unhealthy food habits with regard to refined sugars, fat, and micronutrients were observed. These adolescent sprinters should be encouraged to consume more nonsweetened beverages, fruits, and vegetables. SN - 1526-484X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19033612/Nutritional_habits_of_Flemish_adolescent_sprint_athletes_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/childnutrition.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -