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Functional MRI/event-related potential study of sensory consonance and dissonance in musicians and nonmusicians.
Neuroreport. 2009 Jan 07; 20(1):87-92.N

Abstract

Pleasurability of individual chords, known as sensory consonance, is widely regarded as physiologically determined and has been shown to be associated with differential activity in the auditory cortex and in several other regions. Here, we present results obtained contrasting isolated four-note chords classified as consonant or dissonant in tonal music. Using event-related functional MRI, consonant chords were found to elicit a larger haemodynamic response in the inferior and middle frontal gyri, premotor cortex and inferior parietal lobule. The effect was right lateralized for nonmusicians and less asymmetric for musicians. Using event-related potentials, the degree of sensory consonance was found to modulate the amplitude of the P1 in both groups and of the N2 in musicians only.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Science Direction Unit, Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Neurologico Carlo Besta via Celoria 11, Milano, Italy. lminati@istituto-besta.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19033878

Citation

Minati, Ludovico, et al. "Functional MRI/event-related Potential Study of Sensory Consonance and Dissonance in Musicians and Nonmusicians." Neuroreport, vol. 20, no. 1, 2009, pp. 87-92.
Minati L, Rosazza C, D'Incerti L, et al. Functional MRI/event-related potential study of sensory consonance and dissonance in musicians and nonmusicians. Neuroreport. 2009;20(1):87-92.
Minati, L., Rosazza, C., D'Incerti, L., Pietrocini, E., Valentini, L., Scaioli, V., Loveday, C., & Bruzzone, M. G. (2009). Functional MRI/event-related potential study of sensory consonance and dissonance in musicians and nonmusicians. Neuroreport, 20(1), 87-92. https://doi.org/10.1097/WNR.0b013e32831af235
Minati L, et al. Functional MRI/event-related Potential Study of Sensory Consonance and Dissonance in Musicians and Nonmusicians. Neuroreport. 2009 Jan 7;20(1):87-92. PubMed PMID: 19033878.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Functional MRI/event-related potential study of sensory consonance and dissonance in musicians and nonmusicians. AU - Minati,Ludovico, AU - Rosazza,Cristina, AU - D'Incerti,Ludovico, AU - Pietrocini,Emanuela, AU - Valentini,Laura, AU - Scaioli,Vidmer, AU - Loveday,Catherine, AU - Bruzzone,Maria Grazia, PY - 2008/11/27/pubmed PY - 2009/2/20/medline PY - 2008/11/27/entrez SP - 87 EP - 92 JF - Neuroreport JO - Neuroreport VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - Pleasurability of individual chords, known as sensory consonance, is widely regarded as physiologically determined and has been shown to be associated with differential activity in the auditory cortex and in several other regions. Here, we present results obtained contrasting isolated four-note chords classified as consonant or dissonant in tonal music. Using event-related functional MRI, consonant chords were found to elicit a larger haemodynamic response in the inferior and middle frontal gyri, premotor cortex and inferior parietal lobule. The effect was right lateralized for nonmusicians and less asymmetric for musicians. Using event-related potentials, the degree of sensory consonance was found to modulate the amplitude of the P1 in both groups and of the N2 in musicians only. SN - 1473-558X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19033878/Functional_MRI/event_related_potential_study_of_sensory_consonance_and_dissonance_in_musicians_and_nonmusicians_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/WNR.0b013e32831af235 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -