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Malaria treatment-seeking behaviour and recovery from malaria in a highland area of Kenya.
Malar J. 2008 Nov 26; 7:245.MJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Malaria epidemics in highland areas of Kenya cause significant morbidity and mortality.

METHODS

To assess treatment-seeking behaviour for malaria in these areas, a questionnaire was administered to 117 randomly selected households in the highland area of Kipsamoite, Kenya. Self-reported episodes of malaria occurred in 100 adults and 66 children.

RESULTS

The most frequent initial sources of treatment for malaria in adults and children were medical facilities (66.0% and 66.7%) and local shops (19.0% and 30.3%). Adults and children who initially visited a medical facility for treatment were significantly more likely to recover and require no further treatment than those who initially went to a local shop (adults, 84.9% v. 36.8%, P < 0.0001, and children, 79.6% v. 40.0%, P = 0.002, respectively). Individuals who attended medical facilities recalled receiving anti-malarial medication significantly more frequently than those who visited shops (adults, 100% vs. 29.4%, and children, 100% v. 5.0%, respectively, both P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION

A significant proportion of this highland population chooses local shops for initial malaria treatment and receives inappropriate medication at these localshops, reslting in delay of effective treatment. Shopkeeper education has the potential to be a component of prevention or containment strategies for malaria epidemics in highland areas.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Global Pediatrics and Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. odadakasumba@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19036154

Citation

Sumba, Peter O., et al. "Malaria Treatment-seeking Behaviour and Recovery From Malaria in a Highland Area of Kenya." Malaria Journal, vol. 7, 2008, p. 245.
Sumba PO, Wong SL, Kanzaria HK, et al. Malaria treatment-seeking behaviour and recovery from malaria in a highland area of Kenya. Malar J. 2008;7:245.
Sumba, P. O., Wong, S. L., Kanzaria, H. K., Johnson, K. A., & John, C. C. (2008). Malaria treatment-seeking behaviour and recovery from malaria in a highland area of Kenya. Malaria Journal, 7, 245. https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-7-245
Sumba PO, et al. Malaria Treatment-seeking Behaviour and Recovery From Malaria in a Highland Area of Kenya. Malar J. 2008 Nov 26;7:245. PubMed PMID: 19036154.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Malaria treatment-seeking behaviour and recovery from malaria in a highland area of Kenya. AU - Sumba,Peter O, AU - Wong,S Lindsey, AU - Kanzaria,Hemal K, AU - Johnson,Kelsey A, AU - John,Chandy C, Y1 - 2008/11/26/ PY - 2008/06/05/received PY - 2008/11/26/accepted PY - 2008/11/28/pubmed PY - 2009/1/30/medline PY - 2008/11/28/entrez SP - 245 EP - 245 JF - Malaria journal JO - Malar J VL - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Malaria epidemics in highland areas of Kenya cause significant morbidity and mortality. METHODS: To assess treatment-seeking behaviour for malaria in these areas, a questionnaire was administered to 117 randomly selected households in the highland area of Kipsamoite, Kenya. Self-reported episodes of malaria occurred in 100 adults and 66 children. RESULTS: The most frequent initial sources of treatment for malaria in adults and children were medical facilities (66.0% and 66.7%) and local shops (19.0% and 30.3%). Adults and children who initially visited a medical facility for treatment were significantly more likely to recover and require no further treatment than those who initially went to a local shop (adults, 84.9% v. 36.8%, P < 0.0001, and children, 79.6% v. 40.0%, P = 0.002, respectively). Individuals who attended medical facilities recalled receiving anti-malarial medication significantly more frequently than those who visited shops (adults, 100% vs. 29.4%, and children, 100% v. 5.0%, respectively, both P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of this highland population chooses local shops for initial malaria treatment and receives inappropriate medication at these localshops, reslting in delay of effective treatment. Shopkeeper education has the potential to be a component of prevention or containment strategies for malaria epidemics in highland areas. SN - 1475-2875 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19036154/Malaria_treatment_seeking_behaviour_and_recovery_from_malaria_in_a_highland_area_of_Kenya_ L2 - https://malariajournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2875-7-245 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -