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Fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c as risk factors for Type 2 diabetes.
Diabet Med. 2008 Oct; 25(10):1157-63.DM

Abstract

AIMS

We examined the value of combining fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) as a predictor of diabetes, using the new American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria of FPG and lower cut-off point of HbA(1c).

METHODS

A retrospective cohort study was conducted from 1998 to 2006, inclusive, in 10 042 persons (55 884 person-years), with a mean age of 53.0 years at baseline. The cumulative incidence of diabetes (defined either as an FPG > or = 7.0 mmol/l or as clinically diagnosed diabetes) was measured.

RESULTS

The cumulative incidence and incidence density of diabetes were 3.7% (368 cases) and 6.6/1000 person-years over a mean follow-up period of 5.5 years. The cumulative incidence of diabetes in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and HbA(1c) 5.5-6.4% was 24.8% (172/694 persons) compared with 0.4% (25/6698 persons), 2.5% (15/605 persons), 7.6% (156/2045 persons) in those with normal fasting glucose (NFG) and HbA(1c) < 5.5%, NFG and HbA(1c) 5.5-6.4% and IFG and HbA(1c) < 5.5%, respectively. The hazard ratio for diabetes, adjusted for possible confounders, was 7.4 (95% confidence interval, 4.70 to 11.74) for those with NFG and HbA(1c) 5.5-6.4%, 14.4 (11.93 to 27.79) for those with IFG and HbA(1c) < 5.5% and 38.4 (24.63 to 59.88) for those with IFG and HbA(1c) 5.5-6.4%.

CONCLUSIONS

The combination of FPG and HbA(1c) identifies individuals who are at risk of progression to Type 2 diabetes at the new ADA criteria of FPG and a lower cut-off point of HbA(1c) than previous studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Graduate School Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. inouek@m.u-tokyo.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19046193

Citation

Inoue, Kazuo, et al. "Fasting Plasma Glucose and HbA1c as Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes." Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, vol. 25, no. 10, 2008, pp. 1157-63.
Inoue K, Matsumoto M, Akimoto K. Fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c as risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. Diabet Med. 2008;25(10):1157-63.
Inoue, K., Matsumoto, M., & Akimoto, K. (2008). Fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c as risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, 25(10), 1157-63. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2008.02572.x
Inoue K, Matsumoto M, Akimoto K. Fasting Plasma Glucose and HbA1c as Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes. Diabet Med. 2008;25(10):1157-63. PubMed PMID: 19046193.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c as risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. AU - Inoue,Kazuo, AU - Matsumoto,Masatoshi, AU - Akimoto,Kimihiko, PY - 2008/12/3/pubmed PY - 2009/10/10/medline PY - 2008/12/3/entrez SP - 1157 EP - 63 JF - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association JO - Diabet Med VL - 25 IS - 10 N2 - AIMS: We examined the value of combining fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) as a predictor of diabetes, using the new American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria of FPG and lower cut-off point of HbA(1c). METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted from 1998 to 2006, inclusive, in 10 042 persons (55 884 person-years), with a mean age of 53.0 years at baseline. The cumulative incidence of diabetes (defined either as an FPG > or = 7.0 mmol/l or as clinically diagnosed diabetes) was measured. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence and incidence density of diabetes were 3.7% (368 cases) and 6.6/1000 person-years over a mean follow-up period of 5.5 years. The cumulative incidence of diabetes in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and HbA(1c) 5.5-6.4% was 24.8% (172/694 persons) compared with 0.4% (25/6698 persons), 2.5% (15/605 persons), 7.6% (156/2045 persons) in those with normal fasting glucose (NFG) and HbA(1c) < 5.5%, NFG and HbA(1c) 5.5-6.4% and IFG and HbA(1c) < 5.5%, respectively. The hazard ratio for diabetes, adjusted for possible confounders, was 7.4 (95% confidence interval, 4.70 to 11.74) for those with NFG and HbA(1c) 5.5-6.4%, 14.4 (11.93 to 27.79) for those with IFG and HbA(1c) < 5.5% and 38.4 (24.63 to 59.88) for those with IFG and HbA(1c) 5.5-6.4%. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of FPG and HbA(1c) identifies individuals who are at risk of progression to Type 2 diabetes at the new ADA criteria of FPG and a lower cut-off point of HbA(1c) than previous studies. SN - 1464-5491 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19046193/Fasting_plasma_glucose_and_HbA1c_as_risk_factors_for_Type_2_diabetes_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2008.02572.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -