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Anti-influenza drugs: the development of sialidase inhibitors.

Abstract

Viruses, particularly those that are harmful to humans, are the 'silent terrorists' of the twenty-first century. Well over four million humans die per annum as a result of viral infections alone. The scourge of influenza virus has plagued mankind throughout the ages. The fact that new viral strains emerge on a regular basis, particularly out of Asia, establishes a continual socio-economic threat to mankind. The arrival of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 heightened the threat of a potential human pandemic to the point where many countries have put in place 'preparedness plans' to defend against such an outcome. The discovery of the first designer influenza virus sialidase inhibitor and anti-influenza drug Relenza, and subsequently Tamiflu, has now inspired a number of continuing efforts towards the discovery of next generation anti-influenza drugs. Such drugs may act as 'first-line-of-defence' against the spread of influenza infection and buy time for necessary vaccine development particularly in a human pandemic setting. Furthermore, the fact that influenza virus can develop resistance to therapeutics makes these continuing efforts extremely important. An overview of the role of the virus-associated glycoprotein sialidase (neuraminidase) and some of the most recent developments towards the discovery of anti-influenza drugs based on the inhibition of influenza virus sialidase is provided in this chapter.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Queensland, 4222, Australia. m.vonitzstein@griffith.edu.auNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19048199

Citation

von Itzstein, Mark, and Robin Thomson. "Anti-influenza Drugs: the Development of Sialidase Inhibitors." Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, 2009, pp. 111-54.
von Itzstein M, Thomson R. Anti-influenza drugs: the development of sialidase inhibitors. Handb Exp Pharmacol. 2009.
von Itzstein, M., & Thomson, R. (2009). Anti-influenza drugs: the development of sialidase inhibitors. Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, (189), 111-54. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-79086-0_5
von Itzstein M, Thomson R. Anti-influenza Drugs: the Development of Sialidase Inhibitors. Handb Exp Pharmacol. 2009;(189)111-54. PubMed PMID: 19048199.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anti-influenza drugs: the development of sialidase inhibitors. AU - von Itzstein,Mark, AU - Thomson,Robin, PY - 2008/12/3/pubmed PY - 2009/3/6/medline PY - 2008/12/3/entrez SP - 111 EP - 54 JF - Handbook of experimental pharmacology JO - Handb Exp Pharmacol IS - 189 N2 - Viruses, particularly those that are harmful to humans, are the 'silent terrorists' of the twenty-first century. Well over four million humans die per annum as a result of viral infections alone. The scourge of influenza virus has plagued mankind throughout the ages. The fact that new viral strains emerge on a regular basis, particularly out of Asia, establishes a continual socio-economic threat to mankind. The arrival of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 heightened the threat of a potential human pandemic to the point where many countries have put in place 'preparedness plans' to defend against such an outcome. The discovery of the first designer influenza virus sialidase inhibitor and anti-influenza drug Relenza, and subsequently Tamiflu, has now inspired a number of continuing efforts towards the discovery of next generation anti-influenza drugs. Such drugs may act as 'first-line-of-defence' against the spread of influenza infection and buy time for necessary vaccine development particularly in a human pandemic setting. Furthermore, the fact that influenza virus can develop resistance to therapeutics makes these continuing efforts extremely important. An overview of the role of the virus-associated glycoprotein sialidase (neuraminidase) and some of the most recent developments towards the discovery of anti-influenza drugs based on the inhibition of influenza virus sialidase is provided in this chapter. SN - 0171-2004 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19048199/Anti_influenza_drugs:_the_development_of_sialidase_inhibitors_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-79086-0_5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -