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Is developmental coordination disorder a motor imagery deficit?
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2009 Aug; 31(6):720-30.JC

Abstract

This study investigated the notion that children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) show a reduced capacity of internally simulating movements of their own body or motor imagery. Using a mental rotation paradigm the contribution of hand posture to laterality/mirror judgments of bodily and alphanumeric stimuli was studied in 13 children with DCD and 13 matched typically developing (TD) children. Children were asked to judge whether the stimulus on display, rotated over -90 degrees , -30 degrees , +30 degrees , or +90 degrees , was a right or left hand or a canonical or mirror-reversed letter. Analysis of accuracy (ACC) and response times (RTs) demonstrated that children with DCD were generally slower and made more errors. RTs to letter stimuli were faster than those to hand stimuli in both DCD and TD children. For both groups RTs profiles were influenced by the orientation of the stimulus, showing longer response times for larger rotations. Clockwise rotations of right hands resulted in slower judgments than did counterclockwise rotations, whereas the reverse was true for left hands. Moreover, the results also indicate a contribution of hand posture to the laterality judgments of hands, with longer RTs when the posture of the participants' hands was opposite to the posture of the hands on display. Importantly, these effects that suggest an imagery strategy engaging motor processes were present in both groups. Apparently, the children with DCD of the present study did rely on motor imagery to solve the mental rotation task; however, their judgments seem to be compromised by a less well-defined internal model.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Biomedical Research into Human Movement and Health, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester, M1 5GD, UK. f.deconinck@mmu.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19048429

Citation

Deconinck, Frederik J A., et al. "Is Developmental Coordination Disorder a Motor Imagery Deficit?" Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, vol. 31, no. 6, 2009, pp. 720-30.
Deconinck FJ, Spitaels L, Fias W, et al. Is developmental coordination disorder a motor imagery deficit? J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2009;31(6):720-30.
Deconinck, F. J., Spitaels, L., Fias, W., & Lenoir, M. (2009). Is developmental coordination disorder a motor imagery deficit? Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 31(6), 720-30. https://doi.org/10.1080/13803390802484805
Deconinck FJ, et al. Is Developmental Coordination Disorder a Motor Imagery Deficit. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2009;31(6):720-30. PubMed PMID: 19048429.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is developmental coordination disorder a motor imagery deficit? AU - Deconinck,Frederik J A, AU - Spitaels,Liesbeth, AU - Fias,Wim, AU - Lenoir,Matthieu, Y1 - 2008/12/01/ PY - 2008/12/3/pubmed PY - 2010/5/22/medline PY - 2008/12/3/entrez SP - 720 EP - 30 JF - Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology JO - J Clin Exp Neuropsychol VL - 31 IS - 6 N2 - This study investigated the notion that children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) show a reduced capacity of internally simulating movements of their own body or motor imagery. Using a mental rotation paradigm the contribution of hand posture to laterality/mirror judgments of bodily and alphanumeric stimuli was studied in 13 children with DCD and 13 matched typically developing (TD) children. Children were asked to judge whether the stimulus on display, rotated over -90 degrees , -30 degrees , +30 degrees , or +90 degrees , was a right or left hand or a canonical or mirror-reversed letter. Analysis of accuracy (ACC) and response times (RTs) demonstrated that children with DCD were generally slower and made more errors. RTs to letter stimuli were faster than those to hand stimuli in both DCD and TD children. For both groups RTs profiles were influenced by the orientation of the stimulus, showing longer response times for larger rotations. Clockwise rotations of right hands resulted in slower judgments than did counterclockwise rotations, whereas the reverse was true for left hands. Moreover, the results also indicate a contribution of hand posture to the laterality judgments of hands, with longer RTs when the posture of the participants' hands was opposite to the posture of the hands on display. Importantly, these effects that suggest an imagery strategy engaging motor processes were present in both groups. Apparently, the children with DCD of the present study did rely on motor imagery to solve the mental rotation task; however, their judgments seem to be compromised by a less well-defined internal model. SN - 1744-411X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19048429/Is_developmental_coordination_disorder_a_motor_imagery_deficit L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13803390802484805 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -