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Smoking in movies in Australia: who feels over-exposed and what level of regulation will the community accept?
Health Promot J Austr. 2008 Dec; 19(3):229-31.HP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to examine recent levels of exposure to smoking in movies, how the community perceived the level of smoking they saw in recently-viewed movies and whether there was community support for any form of regulation.

METHODS

As part of a 2004 New South Wales survey of smoking-related perceptions and practices, 1,154 adults participated in a computer-assisted telephone interview about perceptions relating to smoking depiction in movies and television.

RESULTS

More than one-quarter of those who had seen a recent movie in the cinema (28.5%) or on DVD (33.9%) thought that the movie contained excessive or inappropriate smoking. More than half the sample (59.1%) considered it likely the tobacco industry played a role in the level of smoking depiction, although only 18% of those who thought a recent movie contained excessive smoking attributed this to the tobacco industry. Almost two-thirds of respondents favoured screening anti-tobacco advertisements prior to movies with smoking.

CONCLUSION

Cinema and DVD movies commonly include scenes where there is excessive or inappropriate smoking. It is widely believed that the tobacco industry is contributing to this, and there is strong community support for action to curb the harmful influences this may be having.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Health Research & Psycho-oncology (CHeRP), TheCancer Council NSW, The University of Newcastle, Hunter Medical Research Institute, New South Wales. Chris.Paul@newcastle.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19053942

Citation

Paul, Christine L., et al. "Smoking in Movies in Australia: Who Feels Over-exposed and what Level of Regulation Will the Community Accept?" Health Promotion Journal of Australia : Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals, vol. 19, no. 3, 2008, pp. 229-31.
Paul CL, Walsh RA, Stacey F, et al. Smoking in movies in Australia: who feels over-exposed and what level of regulation will the community accept? Health Promot J Austr. 2008;19(3):229-31.
Paul, C. L., Walsh, R. A., Stacey, F., Tzelepis, F., Oakes, W., & Tang, A. (2008). Smoking in movies in Australia: who feels over-exposed and what level of regulation will the community accept? Health Promotion Journal of Australia : Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals, 19(3), 229-31.
Paul CL, et al. Smoking in Movies in Australia: Who Feels Over-exposed and what Level of Regulation Will the Community Accept. Health Promot J Austr. 2008;19(3):229-31. PubMed PMID: 19053942.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking in movies in Australia: who feels over-exposed and what level of regulation will the community accept? AU - Paul,Christine L, AU - Walsh,Raoul A, AU - Stacey,Fiona, AU - Tzelepis,Flora, AU - Oakes,Wendy, AU - Tang,Anita, PY - 2008/12/5/pubmed PY - 2009/2/20/medline PY - 2008/12/5/entrez SP - 229 EP - 31 JF - Health promotion journal of Australia : official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals JO - Health Promot J Austr VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine recent levels of exposure to smoking in movies, how the community perceived the level of smoking they saw in recently-viewed movies and whether there was community support for any form of regulation. METHODS: As part of a 2004 New South Wales survey of smoking-related perceptions and practices, 1,154 adults participated in a computer-assisted telephone interview about perceptions relating to smoking depiction in movies and television. RESULTS: More than one-quarter of those who had seen a recent movie in the cinema (28.5%) or on DVD (33.9%) thought that the movie contained excessive or inappropriate smoking. More than half the sample (59.1%) considered it likely the tobacco industry played a role in the level of smoking depiction, although only 18% of those who thought a recent movie contained excessive smoking attributed this to the tobacco industry. Almost two-thirds of respondents favoured screening anti-tobacco advertisements prior to movies with smoking. CONCLUSION: Cinema and DVD movies commonly include scenes where there is excessive or inappropriate smoking. It is widely believed that the tobacco industry is contributing to this, and there is strong community support for action to curb the harmful influences this may be having. SN - 1036-1073 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19053942/full_citation/Smoking_in_movies_in_Australia:_who_feels_over_exposed_and_what_level_of_regulation_will_the_community_accept L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1036-1073&date=2008&volume=19&issue=3&spage=229 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -