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Antimicrobial effect and shelf-life extension by combined thermal and pulsed electric field treatment of milk.
J Appl Microbiol. 2009 Jan; 106(1):241-8.JA

Abstract

AIMS

The impact of a combined hurdle treatment of heat and pulsed electric fields (PEF) was studied on native microbiota used for the inoculation of low-fat ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk and whole raw milk. Microbiological shelf-life of the latter following hurdle treatment or thermal pasteurization was also investigated.

METHODS AND RESULTS

UHT milk was preheated to 30 degrees C, 40 degrees C or 50 degrees C over a 60-s period, pulsed for 50 micros or 60 micros at a field strength of 40 kV cm(-1) or for 33 micros at 50 kV cm(-1). Heat and PEF reduced the microbial count by a maximum of 6.4 log in UHT milk (50 degrees C; 50 kV cm(-1), 33 micros) compared to 6.0 log (P > or = 0.05) obtained by thermal pasteurization (26 s, 72 degrees C). When raw milk was treated with a combination of hurdles (50 degrees C; 40 kV cm(-1), 60 micros) a 6.0 log inactivation of microbiota was achieved and microbiological milk shelf-life was extended to 21 days under refrigeration (4 degrees C) vs 14 days in thermally pasteurized milk. Native microbiota was decreased by 6.7 log following conventional pasteurization.

CONCLUSIONS

The findings suggest that heat and PEF achieved similar inactivation of native microbiota in milk and longer stabilization of microbiological shelf-life than thermal pasteurization.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY

A hurdle approach of heat and PEF could represent a valid milk processing alternative to conventional pasteurization. Hurdle treatment might also preserve native milk quality better due to less thermal exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, College of Life Sciences, UCD Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19054228

Citation

Walkling-Ribeiro, M, et al. "Antimicrobial Effect and Shelf-life Extension By Combined Thermal and Pulsed Electric Field Treatment of Milk." Journal of Applied Microbiology, vol. 106, no. 1, 2009, pp. 241-8.
Walkling-Ribeiro M, Noci F, Cronin DA, et al. Antimicrobial effect and shelf-life extension by combined thermal and pulsed electric field treatment of milk. J Appl Microbiol. 2009;106(1):241-8.
Walkling-Ribeiro, M., Noci, F., Cronin, D. A., Lyng, J. G., & Morgan, D. J. (2009). Antimicrobial effect and shelf-life extension by combined thermal and pulsed electric field treatment of milk. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 106(1), 241-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2008.03997.x
Walkling-Ribeiro M, et al. Antimicrobial Effect and Shelf-life Extension By Combined Thermal and Pulsed Electric Field Treatment of Milk. J Appl Microbiol. 2009;106(1):241-8. PubMed PMID: 19054228.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antimicrobial effect and shelf-life extension by combined thermal and pulsed electric field treatment of milk. AU - Walkling-Ribeiro,M, AU - Noci,F, AU - Cronin,D A, AU - Lyng,J G, AU - Morgan,D J, Y1 - 2008/11/29/ PY - 2008/12/5/pubmed PY - 2010/2/23/medline PY - 2008/12/5/entrez SP - 241 EP - 8 JF - Journal of applied microbiology JO - J Appl Microbiol VL - 106 IS - 1 N2 - AIMS: The impact of a combined hurdle treatment of heat and pulsed electric fields (PEF) was studied on native microbiota used for the inoculation of low-fat ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk and whole raw milk. Microbiological shelf-life of the latter following hurdle treatment or thermal pasteurization was also investigated. METHODS AND RESULTS: UHT milk was preheated to 30 degrees C, 40 degrees C or 50 degrees C over a 60-s period, pulsed for 50 micros or 60 micros at a field strength of 40 kV cm(-1) or for 33 micros at 50 kV cm(-1). Heat and PEF reduced the microbial count by a maximum of 6.4 log in UHT milk (50 degrees C; 50 kV cm(-1), 33 micros) compared to 6.0 log (P > or = 0.05) obtained by thermal pasteurization (26 s, 72 degrees C). When raw milk was treated with a combination of hurdles (50 degrees C; 40 kV cm(-1), 60 micros) a 6.0 log inactivation of microbiota was achieved and microbiological milk shelf-life was extended to 21 days under refrigeration (4 degrees C) vs 14 days in thermally pasteurized milk. Native microbiota was decreased by 6.7 log following conventional pasteurization. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that heat and PEF achieved similar inactivation of native microbiota in milk and longer stabilization of microbiological shelf-life than thermal pasteurization. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: A hurdle approach of heat and PEF could represent a valid milk processing alternative to conventional pasteurization. Hurdle treatment might also preserve native milk quality better due to less thermal exposure. SN - 1365-2672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19054228/Antimicrobial_effect_and_shelf_life_extension_by_combined_thermal_and_pulsed_electric_field_treatment_of_milk_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2008.03997.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -