Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock: we could go faster.
J Crit Care. 2008 Dec; 23(4):455-60.JC

Abstract

PURPOSE

The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of applying sepsis bundles in the intensive care unit (ICU) and their effect on outcomes.

METHODS

In this prospective, observational study in a 31-bed capacity department of intensive care, we measured the time taken to perform sepsis bundle interventions in 69 consecutive patients with severe sepsis or septic shock.

RESULTS

Compliance with the 6-hour bundle was obtained in 44 (72%) of 61 patients; these patients had a lower mortality rate (16% vs 41%, P = .04) and shorter ICU stay (median [range], 5 [3-10] vs 9 [6-19] days, P = .01) than other patients. Compliance with the 24-hour bundle was obtained in 30 (67%) of 44 eligible patients. The mortality rate and duration of ICU stay were not significantly lower in the 24-hour compliant as compared with the noncompliant group (23% vs 33% and 6 [4-11] vs 9 [6-25] days, respectively; P value is not significant). Patients who complied with the 24-hour sepsis bundle after only 12 hours had a lower mortality rate (10% vs 39%, P = .036) and shorter stay (6 [4-10] vs 9 [6-25] days, P = .055) than those who were compliant after 24 hours.

CONCLUSIONS

Correct application of the sepsis bundles was associated with reduced mortality and length of ICU stay. Earlier implementation of the 24-hour management bundle could result in better outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Cattinara Hospital, University of Trieste, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19056006

Citation

Zambon, Massimo, et al. "Implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: We Could Go Faster." Journal of Critical Care, vol. 23, no. 4, 2008, pp. 455-60.
Zambon M, Ceola M, Almeida-de-Castro R, et al. Implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock: we could go faster. J Crit Care. 2008;23(4):455-60.
Zambon, M., Ceola, M., Almeida-de-Castro, R., Gullo, A., & Vincent, J. L. (2008). Implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock: we could go faster. Journal of Critical Care, 23(4), 455-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrc.2007.08.003
Zambon M, et al. Implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: We Could Go Faster. J Crit Care. 2008;23(4):455-60. PubMed PMID: 19056006.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock: we could go faster. AU - Zambon,Massimo, AU - Ceola,Marcello, AU - Almeida-de-Castro,Roberto, AU - Gullo,Antonino, AU - Vincent,Jean-Louis, Y1 - 2007/12/11/ PY - 2007/03/08/received PY - 2007/08/02/revised PY - 2007/08/13/accepted PY - 2008/12/6/pubmed PY - 2009/6/23/medline PY - 2008/12/6/entrez SP - 455 EP - 60 JF - Journal of critical care JO - J Crit Care VL - 23 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of applying sepsis bundles in the intensive care unit (ICU) and their effect on outcomes. METHODS: In this prospective, observational study in a 31-bed capacity department of intensive care, we measured the time taken to perform sepsis bundle interventions in 69 consecutive patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. RESULTS: Compliance with the 6-hour bundle was obtained in 44 (72%) of 61 patients; these patients had a lower mortality rate (16% vs 41%, P = .04) and shorter ICU stay (median [range], 5 [3-10] vs 9 [6-19] days, P = .01) than other patients. Compliance with the 24-hour bundle was obtained in 30 (67%) of 44 eligible patients. The mortality rate and duration of ICU stay were not significantly lower in the 24-hour compliant as compared with the noncompliant group (23% vs 33% and 6 [4-11] vs 9 [6-25] days, respectively; P value is not significant). Patients who complied with the 24-hour sepsis bundle after only 12 hours had a lower mortality rate (10% vs 39%, P = .036) and shorter stay (6 [4-10] vs 9 [6-25] days, P = .055) than those who were compliant after 24 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Correct application of the sepsis bundles was associated with reduced mortality and length of ICU stay. Earlier implementation of the 24-hour management bundle could result in better outcomes. SN - 1557-8615 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19056006/Implementation_of_the_Surviving_Sepsis_Campaign_guidelines_for_severe_sepsis_and_septic_shock:_we_could_go_faster_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0883-9441(07)00107-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -