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Basal ganglia contributions to adaptive navigation.
Behav Brain Res. 2009 Apr 12; 199(1):32-42.BB

Abstract

The striatum has long been considered to be selectively important for nondeclarative, procedural types of memory. This stands in contrast with spatial context processing that is typically attributed to hippocampus. Neurophysiological evidence from studies of the neural mechanisms of adaptive navigation reveals that distinct neural systems such as the striatum and hippocampus continuously process task relevant information regardless of the current cognitive strategy. For example, both striatal and hippocampal neural representations reflect spatial location, directional heading, reward, and egocentric movement features of a test situation in an experience-dependent way, and independent of task demands. Thus, continual parallel processing across memory systems may be the norm rather than the exception. It is suggested that neuromodulators, such as dopamine, may serve to differentially regulate learning-induced neural plasticity mechanisms within these memory systems such that the most successful form of neural processing exerts the strongest control over response selection functions. In this way, dopamine may serve to optimize behavioral choices in the face of changing environmental demands during navigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Psychology Department, Box 351525, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1525, United States. mizumori@u.washington.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19056429

Citation

Mizumori, Sheri J Y., et al. "Basal Ganglia Contributions to Adaptive Navigation." Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 199, no. 1, 2009, pp. 32-42.
Mizumori SJ, Puryear CB, Martig AK. Basal ganglia contributions to adaptive navigation. Behav Brain Res. 2009;199(1):32-42.
Mizumori, S. J., Puryear, C. B., & Martig, A. K. (2009). Basal ganglia contributions to adaptive navigation. Behavioural Brain Research, 199(1), 32-42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2008.11.014
Mizumori SJ, Puryear CB, Martig AK. Basal Ganglia Contributions to Adaptive Navigation. Behav Brain Res. 2009 Apr 12;199(1):32-42. PubMed PMID: 19056429.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Basal ganglia contributions to adaptive navigation. AU - Mizumori,Sheri J Y, AU - Puryear,Corey B, AU - Martig,Adria K, Y1 - 2008/11/14/ PY - 2008/06/10/received PY - 2008/11/06/revised PY - 2008/11/08/accepted PY - 2008/12/6/pubmed PY - 2009/5/14/medline PY - 2008/12/6/entrez SP - 32 EP - 42 JF - Behavioural brain research JO - Behav Brain Res VL - 199 IS - 1 N2 - The striatum has long been considered to be selectively important for nondeclarative, procedural types of memory. This stands in contrast with spatial context processing that is typically attributed to hippocampus. Neurophysiological evidence from studies of the neural mechanisms of adaptive navigation reveals that distinct neural systems such as the striatum and hippocampus continuously process task relevant information regardless of the current cognitive strategy. For example, both striatal and hippocampal neural representations reflect spatial location, directional heading, reward, and egocentric movement features of a test situation in an experience-dependent way, and independent of task demands. Thus, continual parallel processing across memory systems may be the norm rather than the exception. It is suggested that neuromodulators, such as dopamine, may serve to differentially regulate learning-induced neural plasticity mechanisms within these memory systems such that the most successful form of neural processing exerts the strongest control over response selection functions. In this way, dopamine may serve to optimize behavioral choices in the face of changing environmental demands during navigation. SN - 1872-7549 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19056429/Basal_ganglia_contributions_to_adaptive_navigation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-4328(08)00622-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -