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Dietary patterns and ovarian cancer risk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence for a role of individual foods and nutrients in the causation of ovarian cancer is inconclusive. To date, few studies have considered dietary patterns in relation to ovarian cancer risk.

OBJECTIVE

We conducted a population-based case-control study in Australia to identify and analyze dietary patterns in relation to ovarian cancer risk.

DESIGN

Principal components analysis of 40 food groups was performed to identify eating patterns in 683 women with epithelial ovarian cancer and in 777 control women aged 18-79 y. Detailed information on risk factors was obtained through face-to-face interviews, whereas dietary information was obtained by administering a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire for subjects to complete themselves. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for ovarian cancer risk were estimated with logistic regression modeling.

RESULTS

Three major eating patterns were identified: "snacks and alcohol," "fruit and vegetable," and "meat and fat." A significant inverse association between the snacks and alcohol pattern and ovarian cancer risk (highest compared with lowest group, multivariable-adjusted OR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.82; P for trend: 0.001) was attenuated after further adjustment for white or red wine intake. The fruit and vegetable pattern was not associated with risk. The meat and fat pattern was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer (highest compared with lowest group, multivariable-adjusted OR: 2.49; 95% CI: 1.75, 3.55; P for trend < 0.0001). Further adjustment for body mass index strengthened this association.

CONCLUSIONS

A diet characterized by high meat and fat intake may increase the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. A diet high in fruit and vegetables was not associated with reduced risk.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Cancer and Population Studies Group, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Body Mass Index
    Case-Control Studies
    Diet
    Diet Surveys
    Dietary Fats
    Female
    Fruit
    Humans
    Logistic Models
    Meat
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Odds Ratio
    Ovarian Neoplasms
    Principal Component Analysis
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Vegetables
    Wine
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19056595

    Citation

    Kolahdooz, Fariba, et al. "Dietary Patterns and Ovarian Cancer Risk." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 89, no. 1, 2009, pp. 297-304.
    Kolahdooz F, Ibiebele TI, van der Pols JC, et al. Dietary patterns and ovarian cancer risk. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(1):297-304.
    Kolahdooz, F., Ibiebele, T. I., van der Pols, J. C., & Webb, P. M. (2009). Dietary patterns and ovarian cancer risk. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 89(1), pp. 297-304. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2008.26575.
    Kolahdooz F, et al. Dietary Patterns and Ovarian Cancer Risk. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(1):297-304. PubMed PMID: 19056595.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary patterns and ovarian cancer risk. AU - Kolahdooz,Fariba, AU - Ibiebele,Torukiri I, AU - van der Pols,Jolieke C, AU - Webb,Penelope M, Y1 - 2008/12/03/ PY - 2008/12/6/pubmed PY - 2009/2/6/medline PY - 2008/12/6/entrez SP - 297 EP - 304 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 89 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence for a role of individual foods and nutrients in the causation of ovarian cancer is inconclusive. To date, few studies have considered dietary patterns in relation to ovarian cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a population-based case-control study in Australia to identify and analyze dietary patterns in relation to ovarian cancer risk. DESIGN: Principal components analysis of 40 food groups was performed to identify eating patterns in 683 women with epithelial ovarian cancer and in 777 control women aged 18-79 y. Detailed information on risk factors was obtained through face-to-face interviews, whereas dietary information was obtained by administering a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire for subjects to complete themselves. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for ovarian cancer risk were estimated with logistic regression modeling. RESULTS: Three major eating patterns were identified: "snacks and alcohol," "fruit and vegetable," and "meat and fat." A significant inverse association between the snacks and alcohol pattern and ovarian cancer risk (highest compared with lowest group, multivariable-adjusted OR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.82; P for trend: 0.001) was attenuated after further adjustment for white or red wine intake. The fruit and vegetable pattern was not associated with risk. The meat and fat pattern was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer (highest compared with lowest group, multivariable-adjusted OR: 2.49; 95% CI: 1.75, 3.55; P for trend < 0.0001). Further adjustment for body mass index strengthened this association. CONCLUSIONS: A diet characterized by high meat and fat intake may increase the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. A diet high in fruit and vegetables was not associated with reduced risk. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19056595/Dietary_patterns_and_ovarian_cancer_risk_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2008.26575 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -