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Relationship of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase to atherogenic dyslipidemia and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Feb; 17(2):370-4.O

Abstract

We evaluated possible interactions between BMI and serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) concentration and their effects on the prevalence of poor glycemic control and common comorbidities of diabetes. We assessed whether the association of BMI with poor glycemic control, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia (i.e., high triglycerides and/or low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol), hypercholesterolemia, and hyperuricemia differed according to serum GGT concentration in a cohort of 3,633 type 2 diabetic individuals. The associations of BMI with different outcome measures were significant, but the associations varied remarkably by GGT concentration. As GGT concentration increased, the association of BMI with atherogenic dyslipidemia and glycemic control strengthened (P = 0.01 and 0.004 for interactions, respectively); in contrast, the association of BMI with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and hyperuricemia did not change substantially across GGT quartiles. For example, within the lowest GGT quartile, BMI was not associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia or poor glycemic control, whereas in the highest GGT quartile, the prevalence rates ranged from 62.3 to 74.7% for dyslipidemia and from 75.3 to 83% for poor glycemic control. The results remained unchanged after adjustment for sex, age, alcohol consumption, diabetes duration, and diabetes treatment. In conclusion, our findings show that BMI was associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia and poor glycemic control only when serum GGT activity was in its high-normal range. These findings suggest that obesity itself may not be a sufficient risk factor for atherogenic dyslipidemia or poor glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical and Surgical Sciences, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19057528

Citation

Zoppini, Giacomo, et al. "Relationship of Serum Gamma-glutamyltransferase to Atherogenic Dyslipidemia and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 17, no. 2, 2009, pp. 370-4.
Zoppini G, Targher G, Trombetta M, et al. Relationship of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase to atherogenic dyslipidemia and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009;17(2):370-4.
Zoppini, G., Targher, G., Trombetta, M., Lippi, G., & Muggeo, M. (2009). Relationship of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase to atherogenic dyslipidemia and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 17(2), 370-4. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2008.544
Zoppini G, et al. Relationship of Serum Gamma-glutamyltransferase to Atherogenic Dyslipidemia and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009;17(2):370-4. PubMed PMID: 19057528.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase to atherogenic dyslipidemia and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. AU - Zoppini,Giacomo, AU - Targher,Giovanni, AU - Trombetta,Maddalena, AU - Lippi,Giuseppe, AU - Muggeo,Michele, Y1 - 2008/12/04/ PY - 2008/12/6/pubmed PY - 2009/4/15/medline PY - 2008/12/6/entrez SP - 370 EP - 4 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 17 IS - 2 N2 - We evaluated possible interactions between BMI and serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) concentration and their effects on the prevalence of poor glycemic control and common comorbidities of diabetes. We assessed whether the association of BMI with poor glycemic control, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia (i.e., high triglycerides and/or low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol), hypercholesterolemia, and hyperuricemia differed according to serum GGT concentration in a cohort of 3,633 type 2 diabetic individuals. The associations of BMI with different outcome measures were significant, but the associations varied remarkably by GGT concentration. As GGT concentration increased, the association of BMI with atherogenic dyslipidemia and glycemic control strengthened (P = 0.01 and 0.004 for interactions, respectively); in contrast, the association of BMI with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and hyperuricemia did not change substantially across GGT quartiles. For example, within the lowest GGT quartile, BMI was not associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia or poor glycemic control, whereas in the highest GGT quartile, the prevalence rates ranged from 62.3 to 74.7% for dyslipidemia and from 75.3 to 83% for poor glycemic control. The results remained unchanged after adjustment for sex, age, alcohol consumption, diabetes duration, and diabetes treatment. In conclusion, our findings show that BMI was associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia and poor glycemic control only when serum GGT activity was in its high-normal range. These findings suggest that obesity itself may not be a sufficient risk factor for atherogenic dyslipidemia or poor glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19057528/Relationship_of_serum_gamma_glutamyltransferase_to_atherogenic_dyslipidemia_and_glycemic_control_in_type_2_diabetes_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2008.544 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -