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Association of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of fatty liver.
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2009 Jan; 25(1):64-9.DM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although elevated serum concentrations of gamma-glutamyltrans- ferase (GGT) or alanine aminotransferase (ALT) have been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, it is unclear whether each is an independent predictor of type 2 diabetes or merely a surrogate marker for fatty liver or hepatic injury.

METHODS

We assessed clinical and laboratory findings in 3556 non-diabetic subjects (2217 men, 1339 women; age, 45.7 +/- 8.1 (range 20-79) years) without fatty liver or clinically significant hepatic dysfunction who underwent voluntary medical check-ups at a 5-year interval.

RESULTS

The odds ratio of developing type 2 diabetes increased significantly with increasing GGT and ALT levels at baseline. In multiple logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index (BMI), triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, fasting glucose, and ALT, the highest quartile of GGT remained significantly associated with type 2 diabetes. Compared with the first GGT quartile, the odds ratios of the second, third, and fourth GGT quartiles were 0.64 (95% CI, 0.25-1.65), 1.12 (0.45-2.78), and 3.07 (1.21-7.76), respectively. The adjusted odds ratios for the second, third, and fourth ALT quartiles in the same logistic regression model were 2.40 (0.83-6.94), 2.85 (1.03-7.90), and 4.31 (1.56-11.88), respectively. The risk of type 2 diabetes was additive with respect to GGT and ALT quartiles.

CONCLUSIONS

Increased serum GGT and ALT levels are independent, additive risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in subjects without fatty liver or hepatic dysfunction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19065605

Citation

Kim, Chul-Hee, et al. "Association of Serum Gamma-glutamyltransferase and Alanine Aminotransferase Activities With Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Independent of Fatty Liver." Diabetes/metabolism Research and Reviews, vol. 25, no. 1, 2009, pp. 64-9.
Kim CH, Park JY, Lee KU, et al. Association of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of fatty liver. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2009;25(1):64-9.
Kim, C. H., Park, J. Y., Lee, K. U., Kim, J. H., & Kim, H. K. (2009). Association of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of fatty liver. Diabetes/metabolism Research and Reviews, 25(1), 64-9. https://doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.890
Kim CH, et al. Association of Serum Gamma-glutamyltransferase and Alanine Aminotransferase Activities With Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Independent of Fatty Liver. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2009;25(1):64-9. PubMed PMID: 19065605.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of fatty liver. AU - Kim,Chul-Hee, AU - Park,Joong-Yeol, AU - Lee,Ki-Up, AU - Kim,Jin-Ho, AU - Kim,Hong-Kyu, PY - 2008/12/10/pubmed PY - 2009/5/16/medline PY - 2008/12/10/entrez SP - 64 EP - 9 JF - Diabetes/metabolism research and reviews JO - Diabetes Metab. Res. Rev. VL - 25 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although elevated serum concentrations of gamma-glutamyltrans- ferase (GGT) or alanine aminotransferase (ALT) have been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, it is unclear whether each is an independent predictor of type 2 diabetes or merely a surrogate marker for fatty liver or hepatic injury. METHODS: We assessed clinical and laboratory findings in 3556 non-diabetic subjects (2217 men, 1339 women; age, 45.7 +/- 8.1 (range 20-79) years) without fatty liver or clinically significant hepatic dysfunction who underwent voluntary medical check-ups at a 5-year interval. RESULTS: The odds ratio of developing type 2 diabetes increased significantly with increasing GGT and ALT levels at baseline. In multiple logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index (BMI), triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, fasting glucose, and ALT, the highest quartile of GGT remained significantly associated with type 2 diabetes. Compared with the first GGT quartile, the odds ratios of the second, third, and fourth GGT quartiles were 0.64 (95% CI, 0.25-1.65), 1.12 (0.45-2.78), and 3.07 (1.21-7.76), respectively. The adjusted odds ratios for the second, third, and fourth ALT quartiles in the same logistic regression model were 2.40 (0.83-6.94), 2.85 (1.03-7.90), and 4.31 (1.56-11.88), respectively. The risk of type 2 diabetes was additive with respect to GGT and ALT quartiles. CONCLUSIONS: Increased serum GGT and ALT levels are independent, additive risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in subjects without fatty liver or hepatic dysfunction. SN - 1520-7560 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19065605/Association_of_serum_gamma_glutamyltransferase_and_alanine_aminotransferase_activities_with_risk_of_type_2_diabetes_mellitus_independent_of_fatty_liver_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.890 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -