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The impact of maternal obesity on the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk term pregnancies.
Am J Perinatol. 2009 May; 26(5):345-9.AJ

Abstract

We investigated the impact of maternal obesity on pregnancy outcomes. Women with normal or obese body mass index (BMI) who delivered singleton infants at term were identified from a perinatal database. Rates of pregnancy complications and neonatal outcomes were compared between women with normal prepregnancy BMI (20 to 24.9 kg/m (2), N = 9171) and those with an obese prepregnancy BMI (> or = 30, N = 3744). Rates of pregnancy complications and neonatal outcomes were also evaluated by the level of obesity (obese [30 to 34.9 kg/m (2), N = 2106], severe obesity [35 to 39.9 kg/m (2), N = 953], and morbid obesity [> or = 40 kg/m (2), N = 685]). Rates of gestational diabetes (12.0% versus 3.7%, P < 0.001, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 3.5 [3.0, 4.1]) and gestational hypertension (30.9% versus 9.0%, P < 0.001, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 4.5 [4.1, 5.0]) were higher for obese versus normal BMI gravidas, respectively. Women with morbid or severe obesity had a greater incidence of gestational diabetes than women with an obese (30 to 34.9 kg/m (2)) or normal BMI (14.1%, 16.4%, 9.6%, and 3.7%, respectively; P < 0.05). The incidence of gestational hypertension increased with maternal BMI (9.0% normal, 25.5% obese, 33.7% severe, 43.4% morbid; all pairwise comparisons P < 0.05). Obese versus normal BMI was associated with more higher-level nursery admissions (8.2% versus 5.8%) and large-for-gestational age infants (12.3% versus 6.5%; P < 0.001). Obesity places a term pregnancy at risk for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA. sjoy@wfubmc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19067282

Citation

Joy, Saju, et al. "The Impact of Maternal Obesity On the Incidence of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in High-risk Term Pregnancies." American Journal of Perinatology, vol. 26, no. 5, 2009, pp. 345-9.
Joy S, Istwan N, Rhea D, et al. The impact of maternal obesity on the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk term pregnancies. Am J Perinatol. 2009;26(5):345-9.
Joy, S., Istwan, N., Rhea, D., Desch, C., & Stanziano, G. (2009). The impact of maternal obesity on the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk term pregnancies. American Journal of Perinatology, 26(5), 345-9. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0028-1110084
Joy S, et al. The Impact of Maternal Obesity On the Incidence of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in High-risk Term Pregnancies. Am J Perinatol. 2009;26(5):345-9. PubMed PMID: 19067282.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of maternal obesity on the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk term pregnancies. AU - Joy,Saju, AU - Istwan,Niki, AU - Rhea,Debbie, AU - Desch,Cheryl, AU - Stanziano,Gary, Y1 - 2008/12/09/ PY - 2008/12/11/pubmed PY - 2009/9/4/medline PY - 2008/12/11/entrez SP - 345 EP - 9 JF - American journal of perinatology JO - Am J Perinatol VL - 26 IS - 5 N2 - We investigated the impact of maternal obesity on pregnancy outcomes. Women with normal or obese body mass index (BMI) who delivered singleton infants at term were identified from a perinatal database. Rates of pregnancy complications and neonatal outcomes were compared between women with normal prepregnancy BMI (20 to 24.9 kg/m (2), N = 9171) and those with an obese prepregnancy BMI (> or = 30, N = 3744). Rates of pregnancy complications and neonatal outcomes were also evaluated by the level of obesity (obese [30 to 34.9 kg/m (2), N = 2106], severe obesity [35 to 39.9 kg/m (2), N = 953], and morbid obesity [> or = 40 kg/m (2), N = 685]). Rates of gestational diabetes (12.0% versus 3.7%, P < 0.001, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 3.5 [3.0, 4.1]) and gestational hypertension (30.9% versus 9.0%, P < 0.001, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 4.5 [4.1, 5.0]) were higher for obese versus normal BMI gravidas, respectively. Women with morbid or severe obesity had a greater incidence of gestational diabetes than women with an obese (30 to 34.9 kg/m (2)) or normal BMI (14.1%, 16.4%, 9.6%, and 3.7%, respectively; P < 0.05). The incidence of gestational hypertension increased with maternal BMI (9.0% normal, 25.5% obese, 33.7% severe, 43.4% morbid; all pairwise comparisons P < 0.05). Obese versus normal BMI was associated with more higher-level nursery admissions (8.2% versus 5.8%) and large-for-gestational age infants (12.3% versus 6.5%; P < 0.001). Obesity places a term pregnancy at risk for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. SN - 1098-8785 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19067282/The_impact_of_maternal_obesity_on_the_incidence_of_adverse_pregnancy_outcomes_in_high_risk_term_pregnancies_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0028-1110084 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -