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STDs among sexually active female college students: does sexual orientation make a difference?
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2008 Dec; 40(4):212-7.PS

Abstract

CONTEXT

Research addressing sexual health or STD risk among lesbian and bisexual college women is scarce.

METHODS

Data on 29,952 sexually active females aged 18-24 who completed the 2006 National College Health Assessment were examined to assess differences in sexual risk factors and recent STD incidence by sexual orientation. Comparisons were analyzed at the bivariate level and through multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS

Bisexual students were the most likely to have had an STD during the past year (9%); lesbians were the least likely (2%). However, lesbians were also the least likely to have had a routine gynecologic examination (46%, compared with 64-73% of others). Among students who had had multiple partners in the past year, those who had had partners of both sexes were more likely to have had an STD (16%) than were students who had had only male partners (9%) or only female partners (6%). Students who had binged on alcohol the last time they partied, had had multiple partners or had had a routine gynecologic examination in the past year, had been tested for HIV or had not used condoms at last vaginal intercourse were at increased odds of having had an STD (odds ratios, 1.3-4.0).

CONCLUSIONS

Sexual health programs targeting female college students, regardless of sexual orientation, must focus on behavioral risks associated with STDs. In addition, the importance of regular gynecologic exams should be emphasized, especially among lesbians. Further research is needed on risk-taking among female college students who are sexually active with both sexes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Promotion, Education and Behavior, Arnold School of Public health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA. llindley@gwm.sc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19067934

Citation

Lindley, Lisa L., et al. "STDs Among Sexually Active Female College Students: Does Sexual Orientation Make a Difference?" Perspectives On Sexual and Reproductive Health, vol. 40, no. 4, 2008, pp. 212-7.
Lindley LL, Barnett CL, Brandt HM, et al. STDs among sexually active female college students: does sexual orientation make a difference? Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2008;40(4):212-7.
Lindley, L. L., Barnett, C. L., Brandt, H. M., Hardin, J. W., & Burcin, M. (2008). STDs among sexually active female college students: does sexual orientation make a difference? Perspectives On Sexual and Reproductive Health, 40(4), 212-7. https://doi.org/10.1363/4021208
Lindley LL, et al. STDs Among Sexually Active Female College Students: Does Sexual Orientation Make a Difference. Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2008;40(4):212-7. PubMed PMID: 19067934.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - STDs among sexually active female college students: does sexual orientation make a difference? AU - Lindley,Lisa L, AU - Barnett,Corrie L, AU - Brandt,Heather M, AU - Hardin,James W, AU - Burcin,Michelle, PY - 2008/12/11/pubmed PY - 2009/3/25/medline PY - 2008/12/11/entrez SP - 212 EP - 7 JF - Perspectives on sexual and reproductive health JO - Perspect Sex Reprod Health VL - 40 IS - 4 N2 - CONTEXT: Research addressing sexual health or STD risk among lesbian and bisexual college women is scarce. METHODS: Data on 29,952 sexually active females aged 18-24 who completed the 2006 National College Health Assessment were examined to assess differences in sexual risk factors and recent STD incidence by sexual orientation. Comparisons were analyzed at the bivariate level and through multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Bisexual students were the most likely to have had an STD during the past year (9%); lesbians were the least likely (2%). However, lesbians were also the least likely to have had a routine gynecologic examination (46%, compared with 64-73% of others). Among students who had had multiple partners in the past year, those who had had partners of both sexes were more likely to have had an STD (16%) than were students who had had only male partners (9%) or only female partners (6%). Students who had binged on alcohol the last time they partied, had had multiple partners or had had a routine gynecologic examination in the past year, had been tested for HIV or had not used condoms at last vaginal intercourse were at increased odds of having had an STD (odds ratios, 1.3-4.0). CONCLUSIONS: Sexual health programs targeting female college students, regardless of sexual orientation, must focus on behavioral risks associated with STDs. In addition, the importance of regular gynecologic exams should be emphasized, especially among lesbians. Further research is needed on risk-taking among female college students who are sexually active with both sexes. SN - 1538-6341 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19067934/STDs_among_sexually_active_female_college_students:_does_sexual_orientation_make_a_difference L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1538-6341&date=2008&volume=40&issue=4&spage=212 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -