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Interaction of metabolic syndrome, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic hepatitis C.
Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Apr; 2(2):207-15.ER

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become one of the most prevalent liver diseases in the Western world. NAFLD represents a wide spectrum of histologic subgroups, with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis as the most aggressive form. The risk of developing NAFLD is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The pathogenesis of NAFLD is a multiple-hit process resulting from hepatic fat deposition that is related to several conditions, including insulin resistance and central obesity. Additional hits, such as oxidative stress or adipocytokines produced by white adipose tissue, can further enhance liver damage leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or fibrosis. Although NAFLD is often the primary liver disease of metabolic conditions, it can also exacerbate other liver diseases such as hepatitis C (HCV); indeed, more than 50% of patients with HCV have hepatic steatosis. Hepatic steatosis can be related to host factors (e.g., obesity, metabolic syndrome or insulin resistance) or to the genotype of virus (e.g., HCV genotype 3). Increasing evidence suggests that hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance and obesity in the setting of HCV have a negative impact on the efficacy of treatment and hepatic progression of fibrosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Liver Diseases at Inova Fairfax Hospital, 3300 Gallows Road, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA. nila.rafiq@inova.orgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19072356

Citation

Rafiq, Nila, and Zobair M. Younossi. "Interaction of Metabolic Syndrome, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Chronic Hepatitis C." Expert Review of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, vol. 2, no. 2, 2008, pp. 207-15.
Rafiq N, Younossi ZM. Interaction of metabolic syndrome, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic hepatitis C. Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008;2(2):207-15.
Rafiq, N., & Younossi, Z. M. (2008). Interaction of metabolic syndrome, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic hepatitis C. Expert Review of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 2(2), 207-15. https://doi.org/10.1586/17474124.2.2.207
Rafiq N, Younossi ZM. Interaction of Metabolic Syndrome, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Chronic Hepatitis C. Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008;2(2):207-15. PubMed PMID: 19072356.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Interaction of metabolic syndrome, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic hepatitis C. AU - Rafiq,Nila, AU - Younossi,Zobair M, PY - 2008/12/17/entrez PY - 2008/12/17/pubmed PY - 2009/3/6/medline SP - 207 EP - 15 JF - Expert review of gastroenterology & hepatology JO - Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 2 IS - 2 N2 - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become one of the most prevalent liver diseases in the Western world. NAFLD represents a wide spectrum of histologic subgroups, with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis as the most aggressive form. The risk of developing NAFLD is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The pathogenesis of NAFLD is a multiple-hit process resulting from hepatic fat deposition that is related to several conditions, including insulin resistance and central obesity. Additional hits, such as oxidative stress or adipocytokines produced by white adipose tissue, can further enhance liver damage leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or fibrosis. Although NAFLD is often the primary liver disease of metabolic conditions, it can also exacerbate other liver diseases such as hepatitis C (HCV); indeed, more than 50% of patients with HCV have hepatic steatosis. Hepatic steatosis can be related to host factors (e.g., obesity, metabolic syndrome or insulin resistance) or to the genotype of virus (e.g., HCV genotype 3). Increasing evidence suggests that hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance and obesity in the setting of HCV have a negative impact on the efficacy of treatment and hepatic progression of fibrosis. SN - 1747-4132 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19072356/Interaction_of_metabolic_syndrome_nonalcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_and_chronic_hepatitis_C_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17474124.2.2.207 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -